Posted in Wrap up

April Reading Wrap Up – O.W.L.s Readathon (Part 2)

“There are two things you know.”

First line in Challenger Deep by Neal Shusterman

Hi, guys. Today you’re getting part 2 of my O.W.L.s Readathon wrap up. Remember to check out part 1 if you missed it. Here in part 2, I have 4 mini-reviews for you so enjoy!

The Near Witch

Author: Victoria Schwab

Published: August 2nd 2011

Genre: YA Fantasy

My rating:

Rating: 3.5 out of 5.

Buzzwords: Witches, small village, sisterly love

O.W.L. Passed: History of Magic

Synopsis: The Near Witch is only an old story told to frighten children.

If the wind calls at night, you must not listen. The wind is lonely, and always looking for company.

And there are no strangers in the town of Near.

These are the truths that Lexi has heard all her life.

But when an actual stranger-a boy who seems to fade like smoke-appears outside her home on the moor at night, she knows that at least one of these sayings is no longer true.

The next night, the children of Near start disappearing from their beds, and the mysterious boy falls under suspicion. Still, he insists on helping Lexi search for them. Something tells her she can trust him.

As the hunt for the children intensifies, so does Lexi’s need to know-about the witch that just might be more than a bedtime story, about the wind that seems to speak through the walls at night, and about the history of this nameless boy.

Part fairy tale, part love story, Victoria Schwab’s debut novel is entirely original yet achingly familiar: a song you heard long ago, a whisper carried by the wind, and a dream you won’t soon forget.

Goodreads

My thoughts

This was weird but in a good way. Victoria Schwab’s debut novel is quite different from her other works. Instead of missing “the usual Schwab”, I really appreciated seeing another side to her writing. It’s more reminiscent of fairy tales really, with a very atmospheric style and a great focus on nature. However, there were some slight imperfections in terms of the writing that revealed that she wasn’t the most experienced author at the time. For example, it became quite repetitive in some areas, but it never reached a level that bothered me very much while reading.

My main issue with the book was the romance which came out of nowhere. It kept feeling forced until the end, and I didn’t exactly see the point of it. Plotwise, a strong friendship would have accomplished the same thing. It was especially frustrating because I know that Schwab went on to write a YA duology without any romance in it, so I know she’s capable of it.

I still recommend this book if it sounds just slightly interesting to you. It has some great themes surrounding fear and what it can do to people. You also get some interesting family dynamics and of course, Victoria Schwab’s writing.

Challenger Deep

Author: Neal Shusterman

Published: April 21st 2015

Genre: YA Contemporary

My rating:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Buzzwords: mental health

O.W.L. Passed: Defence Against the Dark Arts

Synopsis: Caden Bosch is on a ship that’s headed for the deepest point on Earth: Challenger Deep, the southern part of the Marianas Trench.

Caden Bosch is a brilliant high school student whose friends are starting to notice his odd behaviour.

Caden Bosch is designated the ship’s artist in residence to document the journey with images.

Caden Bosch pretends to join the school track team but spends his days walking for miles, absorbed by the thoughts in his head.

Caden Bosch is split between his allegiance to the captain and the allure of mutiny.

Caden Bosch is torn.

Goodreads

My thoughts

I don’t have much to say about this book. It was good without being great. I didn’t connect very much with the story or the characters but just found it interesting and educational. It’s a book that deeply explores mental health, and I really liked that Shusterman relied so heavily on metaphors. It worked really well and I had a great time trying to decipher them all.

If you’re suffering from severe mental health issues or know someone who does, I’ll highly recommend this book.

Dark Matter

Author: Blake Crouch

Published: July 26th 2016

Genre: Sci-fi Thriller

My rating:

Rating: 2 out of 5.

O.W.L. Passed: Arithmancy

Synopsis: Jason Dessen is walking home through the chilly Chicago streets one night, looking forward to a quiet evening in front of the fireplace with his wife, Daniela, and their son, Charlie—when his reality shatters.

It starts with a man in a mask kidnapping him at gunpoint, for reasons Jason can’t begin to fathom—what would anyone want with an ordinary physics professor?—and grows even more terrifying from there, as Jason’s abductor injects him with some unknown drug and watches while he loses consciousness.

When Jason awakes, he’s in a lab, strapped to a gurney—and a man he’s never seen before is cheerily telling him “welcome back!”

Jason soon learns that in this world he’s woken up to, his house is not his house. His wife is not his wife. His son was never born.

And someone is hunting him.

Goodreads

My thoughts

I can’t begin to describe how disappointed I was with this book. So many things about it didn’t work for me. The characters are flat which means I can’t connect to them. I especially found the MC quite annoying. He’s supposed to be this physics professor aka really smart but he very rarely prooved that. I kept figuring things out but then I had to wait for him to catch up. It gave me the sense that these things were drawn out for dramatic purposes but because the author had given the reader so many clues already, the revelations failed to be shocking.

The plot was based on an interesting idea and that’s what kept me reading. However, the detached writing style and the personality-less characters left me sort of numb to the events I was supposed to care about. The ending was also less epic than what I expected it to be.

Overall, I think this book might work for you if you’re a very plot-focused reader. For me, this was a great idea that I’m sure can be executed much better.

Eliza and Her Monsters

Author: Francesca Zappia

Published: May 30th 2017

Genre: YA Contemporary

My rating:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Buzzwords: anxiety, web comics, secret online life

O.W.L. Passed: Muggle Studies

Synopsis: In the real world, Eliza Mirk is shy, weird, smart, and friendless. Online, Eliza is LadyConstellation, the anonymous creator of a popular webcomic called Monstrous Sea. With millions of followers and fans throughout the world, Eliza’s persona is popular. Eliza can’t imagine enjoying the real world as much as she loves her digital community. Then Wallace Warland transfers to her school, and Eliza begins to wonder if a life offline might be worthwhile. But when Eliza’s secret is accidentally shared with the world, everything she’s built—her story, her relationship with Wallace, and even her sanity—begins to fall apart.

With pages from Eliza’s webcomic, as well as screenshots from Eliza’s online forums, this uniquely formatted book will appeal to fans of Noelle Stevenson’s Nimona and Rainbow Rowell’s Fangirl.

Goodreads

My thoughts

I wanted to read this for the anxiety rep and was in no way disappointed. The book really delivered on that front with descriptions of how it feels, what its consequences are and most importantly, how to deal with it. I couldn’t help but compare it to Fangirl while reading because they are so similar stories. Both in terms of anxiety and the online fame thing. Nevertheless, Eliza and Her Monsters handles it differently so I would say that the two books complement each other well.

I really liked that Eliza had a complicated relationship with her family because it felt realistic and remind me of my own family. I wasn’t completely on board with the romance though. I wasn’t convinced that they actually loved each other so I felt a little indifferent about them together. There were also some minor things about the ending that I didn’t care for which is why I ended up giving the book 4 stars. Still a book I would highly recommend if you want to read about anxiety.

And that’s all you get. Let me know if you’ve read any of these and if our opinions align or not. Otherwise I hope you’re all doing okay. Happy reading!

Posted in Wrap up

April 2020 Reading Wrap Up – O.W.L.s Readathon (Part 1)

“Night fell as Death rode into the Great Library of Summershall.”

First line in Sorcery of Thorns by Margaret Rogerson

Hi, guys. Welcome to part 1 of my O.W.L.s Readathon wrap up. Yes, I read so many books that I had to split my wrap into two. I figured 7 mini-reviews in one post was too many so you get the first 3 today and the last 4 tomorrow.

The total number of books I read this month was actually 9! So not all 12 O.W.L.s but 9 is still way more than I expected to read. Here’s a short overview of what the exams I passed:

  • Transfiguration – A book with shapeshifting
  • Anicent Runes – A book with a heart on the cover or in the title
  • Charms – A white cover
  • History of Magic – A book with witches/wizards
  • Defence Against the Dark Arts – A book set on the sea or at the coast
  • Arithmancy – A book outside your favorite genre
  • Potions – A book with less than 150 pages
  • Astronomy – Read the majority of the book when it’s dark outside

I read 2 books that I won’t be doing mini-reviews for. The first is The Ash-Born Boy by Victoria Schwab which is a prequel novella to The Near Witch. I read it for Potions but as it was only 61 pages, I don’t have much to say other than you should read it if you’ve read The Near Witch.
The other book I won’t be reviewing is Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone which I read for Astronomy. I expect people know about that one. I will make seperate post about it but probably not until June.

Let’s take a quick look at my stats for the month:

Basically, I’m pretty proud of myself for doing this well. Enough of that though. Here you have the first 3 mini-reviews.

Sorcery of Thorns

Author: Magaret Rogerson

Published: June 4th 2019

Genre: YA Fantasy

My rating:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Buzzwords: magical libraries, loyal friendships, book about books

O.W.L. Passed: Transfiguration

Synopsis: All sorcerers are evil. Elisabeth has known that as long as she has known anything. Raised as a foundling in one of Austermeer’s Great Libraries, Elisabeth has grown up among the tools of sorcery—magical grimoires that whisper on shelves and rattle beneath iron chains. If provoked, they transform into grotesque monsters of ink and leather. She hopes to become a warden, charged with protecting the kingdom from their power.

Then an act of sabotage releases the library’s most dangerous grimoire. Elisabeth’s desperate intervention implicates her in the crime, and she is torn from her home to face justice in the capital. With no one to turn to but her sworn enemy, the sorcerer Nathaniel Thorn, and his mysterious demonic servant, she finds herself entangled in a centuries-old conspiracy. Not only could the Great Libraries go up in flames, but the world along with them.

As her alliance with Nathaniel grows stronger, Elisabeth starts to question everything she’s been taught—about sorcerers, about the libraries she loves, even about herself. For Elisabeth has a power she has never guessed, and a future she could never have imagined.

Goodreads

My thoughts

This was a surprisingly great book. I had seen a lot of mixed reviews so it was a book I probably wouldn’t have picked up had it not fit an O.W.L. prompt. So glad I decided to read it because these characters are everything to me. I like that there are a few relationships in this book that you can’t completely define by just calling them friendships or romances because those words are not enough. They don’t reflect the love and care between these people that Rogerson spends the entire book laying out for the reader. I love them, and I especially love the character development they go through.

However, I do see why people would have some issues with this book, especially if the plot is very important to them. There were some things surrounding the plot that weren’t completely developed and some things that didn’t really make sense. I, for one, would have loved to know a little bit more about the villain’s motive because it seemed like he was evil just to be evil.

On the plus side, the writing was great and not too flowery. If you’re into character-driven books about books with beautiful writing, I would definitely recommend this one.

The Heart’s Invisible Furies

Author: John Boyne

Published: February 9th 2017

Genre: Historical Fiction/Literary Fiction

My rating:

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Buzzwords: Life stories, Ireland, LGBTQ+, family

O.W.L. Passed: Ancient Runes

Synopsis: Cyril Avery is not a real Avery or at least that’s what his adoptive parents tell him. And he never will be. But if he isn’t a real Avery, then who is he?

Born out of wedlock to a teenage girl cast out from her rural Irish community and adopted by a well-to-do if eccentric Dublin couple via the intervention of a hunchbacked Redemptorist nun, Cyril is adrift in the world, anchored only tenuously by his heartfelt friendship with the infinitely more glamourous and dangerous Julian Woodbead.

At the mercy of fortune and coincidence, he will spend a lifetime coming to know himself and where he came from – and over his three score years and ten, will struggle to discover an identity, a home, a country and much more.

In this, Boyne’s most transcendent work to date, we are shown the story of Ireland from the 1940s to today through the eyes of one ordinary man. The Heart’s Invisible Furies is a novel to make you laugh and cry while reminding us all of the redemptive power of the human spirit.

Goodreads

My thoughts

The Heart’s Invisible Furies is the first book I’ve ever read by John Boyne so I had to get used to his way of writing in the beginning. He has a very distinct writing style with some very long sentences and a lot of dialogue. That might put some people off but I just gotta say that it is done to absolute perfection. It’s not often that I read such a well written book. Boyne is able to convey so much emotion through simple conversations. You can find meaning both in what is actually said but also what is left unsaid, and I’m amazed at his ability to write like that.

That said, this book might not be for everyone as it’s extremely character-focused. We’re literally following one man through his entire life, or rather we see glimpses of his life. But still, life doesn’t have plot so don’t expect much on that front from this book. It’s still worth reading though. It gives you detailed insight into what it was like to be a gay man in Ireland in the latter half of the nineties. So as you might expect, this book will make you emotional. Maybe it will make you cry but I dare say I’ll make you laugh, too. It’s is not without humour and that actually makes the book quite a wholesome one. I would highly recommend it!

Lord of Secrets (The Empty Gods #1)

Author: Breanna Teintze

Published: August 8th 2019

Genre: Fantasy

My rating:

Rating: 1 out of 5.

Buzzwords: Intricate magic system, family bond, necromancy

O.W.L. Passed: Charms

Synopsis: Outlaw wizard Corcoran Gray has enough problems. He’s friendless, penniless and on the run from the tyrannical Mages’ Guild – and with the search for his imprisoned grandfather looking hopeless, his situation can’t get much worse.

So when a fugitive drops into his lap – literally – and gets them both arrested, it’s the last straw – until Gray realises that runaway slave Brix could be the key to his grandfather’s release. All he has to do is break out of prison, break into an ancient underground temple and avoid killing himself with his own magic in the process.

In theory, it’s simple enough. But as secrets unfold and loyalties shift, Gray discovers something with the power to change the nature of life and death itself.

Now Gray must find a way to protect the people he loves, but it could cost him everything, even his soul . . .

Goodreads

My thoughts

No… just no.
This book almost killed my reading spirit. I could tell that the author had a great idea especially concerning the magic system but it was so poorly executed. The magic turned out to be a little too complex compared to how little time went into explaining it. It ended up being the kind of magic that can do anything that’s plot-convenient. That’s always annoying to me, and it was a general problem throughout the book. There were too many conveniences.

The characters couldn’t save it for me either because they didn’t exactly have a personality. I couldn’t connect to them at all. The MC was so boring and annoying. He’s one of those characters who should get a gold medal in self-pity because he spent the entire book feeling sorry for himself. The only slightly interesting character was the villian but he never reached his full potential.

That was 3 reviews from both ends of the spectrum but I hope you enjoyed reading them. How was your reading month? How many O.W.L.s did you get if you participated in the readathon?

Posted in WWW Wednesday

WWW Wednesday – April 29th 2020 (O.W.L.s Week 4)

“Eliza Mirk is the kind of name you give to the creepy girl who clings to her ex-boyfriend for weeks after he’s dumped her because she refuses to accept that he hates her guts.”

First line in Eliza and Her Monsters by Francesca Zappia

Hi, guys. Today I’m giving you the final update on my progress in the O.W.L.s Magical Readathon, and I’m doing it through WWW Wednesday. It’s a weekly meme hosted by Sam @ Taking on a World of Words, and it’s meant to give you all a little insight into my reading this week. I’ll answer the 3 questions:

  • What are you currently reading?
  • What did you recently finish?
  • What do you think you’ll read next

What did you recently finish?

I finished Dark Matter, and now I have another book for the “Popular books I didn’t like”-list. When I updated you last week, I expected to give it 3 stars but the ending bumped it down to 2. It wasn’t as spectacular as I had hoped it would be with such an interesting subject matter. Also still hated the MC. At least it gave me the O.W.L. in Arithmancy.

I also finished Eliza and Her Monster by Francesca Zappia which was a much better experience. I gave it 4 stars and even though it couldn’t compete with my love for Fangirl, it’s still an amazing book. It does a good job of portraying anxiety and doesn’t shy away from showing all the ugly sides as well. This one made sure I got my O.W.L. in Muggle Studies.

Finally, I had to find something for Potions which is a book below 150 pages. I read The Ash-Born Boy by Victoria Schwab which is a prequel novella to The Near Witch which I also read this month. Not really going to rate and review it. Just one I highly recommend if you’ve read The Near Witch.

What are you currently reading?

Guys… I’m reading Harry Potter. I didn’t know how much I needed a reread until I started it. It’s making me want to cry with how good it feels to be back. I’m pathetic lol. I’m even reading my seriously old Danish version so the nostalgia is real! It’s also making me realize that this book was translated in 1999… there are some expressions in there you would never hear today and it’s making me laugh. I’m reading it for my O.W.L. in Astronomy which is going to be my final one. 

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What do you think you’ll read next?

O.W.L.s Magical Readathon might be over but luckily that means that Wyrd and Wonder is starting! The first book I’m going to start is Chosen Ones by Veronica Roth. As the readathon is over, I’m going back to reading two books at a time so I’ll also be starting the audiobook for The Merciful Crow by Maragret Owen.

Posted in WWW Wednesday

WWW Wednesday – April 22nd 2020 (O.W.L.s Week )

There are two things you know.”

First line in Challenger Deep by Neal Shusterman

Hi, guys. Today I’m giving you an update on my progress in the O.W.L.s Magical Readathon, and I’m doing it through WWW Wednesday. It’s a weekly meme hosted by Sam @ Taking on a World of Words, and it’s meant to give you all a little insight into my reading this week. I’ll answer the 3 questions:

  • What are you currently reading?
  • What did you recently finish?
  • What do you think you’ll read next

What did you recently finish?

I finished The Near Witch by Victoria Schwab which I gave 3.5 stars. A very atmospheric story with great writing. However, the plot ended up being a little underwhelming, and the romance was actually not necessary and felt forced. This gave me the O.W.L. in History of Magic.

I also finished Challenger Deep by Neal Shusterman which I gave 4 stars. Slowly trying to work my way through all of this man’s books which so far is very enjoyable. Challenger Deep is all serious business and no fun as it explores mental health. I liked Shusterman’s use of metaphors to make this topic accessable to everyone. Nevertheless, I think this book is mainly written for people who suffer from a severe mental illness or know someone who does. This gave me the O.W.L. in Defence Against the Dark Arts.

What are you currently reading?

Currently reading Dark Matter by Blake Crouch, and I’m 55% into it. I’ve heard nothing but hype around this book so I was very shocked to find out that this author only writes one-dimensional characters. I have several other minor issues with this book but the badly written characters is the main one. I think the concept is interesting enough so I don’t hate the book (yet). I predict I’m going to give it 3 stars which is kind of disappointing as I had expected it to be 5 stars. But let’s see.

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What do you think you’ll read next?

I’m going to start on my O.W.L. for Muggle Studies next and read a contemporary: Eliza and Her Monsters by Francesca Zappia. One that has been on my TBR for way too long.
I might also start Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone because I’m depressed and I need something to cheer me up.  

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Posted in WWW Wednesday

WWW Wednesday – April 15th 2020 (O.W.L.s Week 2)

“Rather inconveniently, I happened to be invisible that day.”

First line in Lord of Secrets by Breanna Teintze

Hi, guys. Today I’m giving you an update on my progress in the O.W.L.s Magical Readathon, and I’m doing it through WWW Wednesday. It’s a weekly meme hosted by Sam @ Taking on a World of Words, and it’s meant to give you all a little insight into my reading this week. I’ll answer the 3 questions:

  • What are you currently reading?
  • What did you recently finish?
  • What do you think you’ll read next

What did you recently finish?

I managed to finish two books and it was two polar opposite experiences.
First I finished The Heart’s Invisible Furies by John Boyne, and oh my god, YES! When I dare to venture out of the fantasy genre, this is the kind of book I want. A heartfelt, character-driven story with impeccable writing. Boyne deploys a very interesting writing style in this book with a lot of dialogue and it just works so well. I can’t recommend this book enough. 5 stars! It also made sure I passed my exam in Ancient Runes.

Lucky enough that I was on such a high when I picked up Lord of Secrets by Breanna Teintze because I ended up giving that one 1 star. I wasn’t feeling the characters at all as they all felt pretty flat and personality-less. Funny example: apparently, two of the characters were falling in love throughout the story, and I didn’t realize until they said it out loud at the end. Yeah, that’s not good and on top of that, there were so many plot conveniences. But hey, at least I passed my exam in Charms.

What are you currently reading?

I’m halfway through The Near Witch by Victoria Schwab for my O.W.L. in History of Magic. I was actually supposed to read Serpent and Dove for this prompt buuut I wasn’t actually able to get the book (libraries are still closed!!). I’m not complaining though because… Victoria Schwab. It’s her first published book so I didn’t really know what to expect but I’m actually quite intrigued. It’s not perfect but I still see myself finishing this within a day or two. 

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What do you think you’ll read next?

Well, when I finish The Near Witch, I’m actually done with my previously set TBR for the O.W.L.s readathon. So now I’m just going to be reading whatever I can find to fit a prompt for the remaining O.W.L.s. I think I’m going to be reading Challenger Deep by Neal Shusterman to fit the Defence Against the Dark Arts prompt about a book set on the sea/coast. 

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Posted in Uncategorized

O.W.L.s Magical Readathon 2020 – TBR

“Here is the boy, drowning.”

First line in More Than This by Patrick Ness

Hi, guys. Today I’m giving you something as rare as a monthly TBR from me. I decided that I wanted to participate in the yearly O.W.L.s Magical Readathon, which is so brilliantly hosted by G from the YouTube channel Book Roast. I’m been following her for a while and saw how much effort she put into the N.E.W.T.s Readathon last fall. I figured I had to try it out so here we are.

Her announcement video is right here:

If you want to learn more about all the details, you should check out the website. The readathon takes place between April 1st and April 30th.

The career I’ve chosen to go for is

Trader of Magical Tomes

Key traits: Eager to learn – Attentive – Calm – Thorough

It’s basically the magical equivalent of a bookshop owner. Of course, that’s what I’m going to be.

The classes (and prompts) required are:

ClassPrompt
Ancient Runes (Heart rune)A book with a heart on the cover or in the title
Charms (Lumos Maxima)A book with a white cover
Transfiguration (Animagus)A book or series that include shapeshifting
History of Magic (Witch hunts)A book featuring witches or wizards

My Picks

Read a book with a heart on the cover or in the title: The Heart’s Invisible Furies by John Boyne.

Synopsis

Cyril Avery is not a real Avery or at least that’s what his adoptive parents tell him. And he never will be. But if he isn’t a real Avery, then who is he?

Born out of wedlock to a teenage girl cast out from her rural Irish community and adopted by a well-to-do if eccentric Dublin couple via the intervention of a hunchbacked Redemptorist nun, Cyril is adrift in the world, anchored only tenuously by his heartfelt friendship with the infinitely more glamourous and dangerous Julian Woodbead.

At the mercy of fortune and coincidence, he will spend a lifetime coming to know himself and where he came from – and over his three score years and ten, will struggle to discover an identity, a home, a country and much more.

In this, Boyne’s most transcendent work to date, we are shown the story of Ireland from the 1940s to today through the eyes of one ordinary man. The Heart’s Invisible Furies is a novel to make you laugh and cry while reminding us all of the redemptive power of the human spirit.

Read a book with a white cover: Lord of Secrets by Breanna Teintze

Synopsis

Outlaw wizard Corcoran Gray has enough problems. He’s friendless, penniless and on the run from the tyrannical Mages’ Guild – and with the search for his imprisoned grandfather looking hopeless, his situation can’t get much worse.

So when a fugitive drops into his lap – literally – and gets them both arrested, it’s the last straw – until Gray realises that runaway slave Brix could be the key to his grandfather’s release. All he has to do is break out of prison, break into an ancient underground temple and avoid killing himself with his own magic in the process.

In theory, it’s simple enough. But as secrets unfold and loyalties shift, Gray discovers something with the power to change the nature of life and death itself.

Now Gray must find a way to protect the people he loves, but it could cost him everything, even his soul . .

A book that includes shapeshifting: Sorcery of Thorns by Margaret Rogerson

Synopsis

All sorcerers are evil. Elisabeth has known that as long as she has known anything. Raised as a foundling in one of Austermeer’s Great Libraries, Elisabeth has grown up among the tools of sorcery—magical grimoires that whisper on shelves and rattle beneath iron chains. If provoked, they transform into grotesque monsters of ink and leather. She hopes to become a warden, charged with protecting the kingdom from their power.

Then an act of sabotage releases the library’s most dangerous grimoire. Elisabeth’s desperate intervention implicates her in the crime, and she is torn from her home to face justice in the capital. With no one to turn to but her sworn enemy, the sorcerer Nathaniel Thorn, and his mysterious demonic servant, she finds herself entangled in a centuries-old conspiracy. Not only could the Great Libraries go up in flames, but the world along with them.

As her alliance with Nathaniel grows stronger, Elisabeth starts to question everything she’s been taught—about sorcerers, about the libraries she loves, even about herself. For Elisabeth has a power she has never guessed, and a future she could never have imagined.

A book featuring witches or wizards: Serpent and Dove by Shelby Mahurin

Synopsis

Two years ago, Louise le Blanc fled her coven and took shelter in the city of Cesarine, forsaking all magic and living off whatever she could steal. There, witches like Lou are hunted. They are feared. And they are burned.

Sworn to the Church as a Chasseur, Reid Diggory has lived his life by one principle: thou shalt not suffer a witch to live. His path was never meant to cross with Lou’s, but a wicked stunt forces them into an impossible union—holy matrimony.

The war between witches and Church is an ancient one, and Lou’s most dangerous enemies bring a fate worse than fire. Unable to ignore her growing feelings, yet powerless to change what she is, a choice must be made.

And love makes fools of us all.

Those are the books I plan to be the ones which will get me my necessary O.W.L.s. However, things are complicated by the fact that currently, all libraries in Denmark are closed (along with everything else). That means it’s a little difficult for me to get the books but I’m trying to work around it by using ebooks. Just letting you know that yes, this is my tbr but it is subject to change in case things don’t work out according to plan.

I’m so excited to participate in my first Magical Readathon! Please let me know if you’re participating too and what career you’ve chosen. Feel free to link you tbr in the comments if you have one. Happy reading!