Posted in Book Memes

Top Ten Tuesday – My Spring TBR

“The Friday before winter break, my mom packed me an overnight bag and a few deadly weapons, and took me to a new boarding school.”

First line in The Titan’s Curse by Rick Riordan

Hi, guys and welcome to this week’s Top Ten Tuesday post. This week’s topic is pretty straight forward: my spring TBR. Top Ten Tuesday is hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl.

I’m so bad at planning so many months worth of reading but I gave it a try. A lot of them are continuations of series but I’m also planning on starting a few new ones. That means that I have 7 books on this list but it’s technically longer with all their sequels. Enjoy!

The Dragon Reborn by Robert Jordan

I want to continue my journey through The Wheel of Time and get as far as possible before the show starts. The Dragon Reborn is book 3 in the series.

The Electric Heir by Victoria Lee

This is the sequel to The Fever King, which I read last year. I’m so excited for the continuation which is out today!

The Long Way to a Small Angry Planet by Becky Chambers

I need to get to this one soon! I made a 5-star prediction post several months ago now, and this is the only one from that list I still need to read. It’s also my last chance to actually have a 5-star read from that list.

Edgedancer by Brandon Sanderson

Technically a short story/novella from The Stormlight Archive series but it has the size of a regular book basically. I only need to read this and then Oathbringer before I’m caught up with the series which I would love to be before the next book comes out in November.

Chainbreaker by Tara Sim

This is the sequel to Timekeeper, which I read September last year and loved and then never continued with the series. It’s stupid because I already feel like I might have to read a summary of Timekeeper before I jump into this one.

The Absolutist by John Boyne

This is mainly on here because I need to read a standalone once in a while. I can’t keep starting series. I’d love to just finish a book and not feel the pressure to pick up a sequel immediately. I’ve been in the mood for historical fiction lately, and this one sounded quite interesting.

Those were a couple of the books I hope to read in the next few months. Let me know what your reading plans are. Happy reading!

Posted in Book Memes

Top Ten Tuesday – Characters I’d Follow on Social Media

“Abandon all hope ye who enter here…”

First line in American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis

Hi, guys and welcome to my Top Ten Tuesday post for the week. This week’s topic is so awesome: Characters I’d follow on social media. I had way too many options for this but I managed to narrow it down to 10. 

I’ve picked characters from worlds that don’t have social media (mainly fantasy books) and tried to imagine them in our real life world. For each character I’ve specified on which platform they have their account and what kind of content they post. Hope you enjoy!

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Wit (The Stormlight Archive)

Social media: Twitter

Type of content: Comedic outbursts that are often offensive. Somtimes, some profound saying that you don’t completely understand but will make you question everything you thought you knew.

Nikolai Lantsov (The Grisha Verse)

Social media: Instagram

Type of content: Mostly selfies (and who would complain) but also pictures of friends caught in embarrasing situations. The occasional political statement.

Peeta Mellark (The Hunger Games)

Social media: YouTube

Type of content: Baking tutorials. Learn how to bake bread with Peeta. Also, cake decorating.

Dandelion (The Witcher)

Social media: YouTube

Type of content: Singing his own songs, often about some dude named “Geralt”. Very intriguing stuff. He also tells stories (but be aware that he will go off on a tangent quite a lot).

Magnus Bane (The Shadowhunter Chronicles)

Social media: YouTube

Type of content: A lifestyle channel. He talks about fashion, gossip and home life. Expect all kinds of guests (seriously, ALL kinds) but espcially family members. Among his followers there has for some reason been a huge demand for a specific video: The Boyfriend Tag.

Jane Eyre (Jane Eyre)

Social media: Blog

Type of content: Her own detailed life experiences. Very relevant if you’ve ever wanted to become a governess. Her blog also has a special feature called “This Month’s Creepy Marriage Proposal” (also referred to as TMCMP).

Albus Dumbledore (Harry Potter)

Social media: Twitter

Type of content: Words of wisdom is the main thing you can expect from him. However, sometimes he will post something that doesn’t make sense. Not even to him.

Haymitch Abernathy (The Hunger Games)

Social media: Twitter

Type of content: Random exclamations that makes you wonder whether he was sober or not when writing it (he wasn’t). Most of them are fun but you’ll also see him question those in power in a way he probably shouldn’t.

Fred and George Weasley (Harry Potter)

Social media: YouTube

Type of content: Pranks on friends, family members and strangers. A lot of the pranks involve people eating something weird (the twins never really explain what) and then they have funny reactions. Well, fun for the people watching at least.

Tyrion Lannister (A Song of Ice and Fire)

Social media: Twitter

Type of content: Roasting people he doesn’t like. He gets very creative with his insults. He mixes it up with some serious political statements and proposals once in a while. Those are mostly ignored.

There you have my post for this week’s Top Ten Tuesday topic. I don’t think I’ve ever had so much fun putting a post together. Now I’m just sad that none of these accounts actually exist. But oh well, I hope you enjoyed it. Let me know your favorite and who you’d follow in the comments.

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Posted in Book Memes

Top Ten Tuesday – Books That Caused A Book Hangover

“When I wake up, the other side of the bed is cold.”

First line in The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins

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Hi, guys. I’m doing a Top Ten Tuesday for once. Today the topic is: The last ten books that gave me a book hangover. If you don’t know what a book hangover is, it’s basically that feeling you have after reading an amazing book and you’re convinced that you’ll never find such a good book again. At the same time you just want more of what you just read so you frantically search for similar reads but it will never be the same. 

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(When you read in public as much as I do, this happens quite frequently)

I’m not someone who experiences very serious book hangovers. Some people find they can’t read another book for a while but I can easily do that. That means that it was a little bit of a struggle for me to find 10 books for this list but I managed. Some of them are pretty old though. 

Half Lost by Sally Green (Final book in The Half Bad Trilogy) 

The Way of Kings by Brandon Sanderson (First book in The Stormlight Archive)

The Binding by Bridget Collins

 

The Starless Sea by Erin Morgenstern

Carry On by Rainbow Rowell

The Winter of the Witch by Katherine Arden (Final book in the Winternight Trilogy)

 

Thunderhead by Neal Shusterman (Second book in the Arc of a Scythe trilogy)

The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins (Yes, all of them)

A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness

 

(And last but certainly not least)

A Little Life by Hanya Yanagihara

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There you have 10 books that had such a huge impact on me that I couldn’t think about anything else for days and sometimes weeks or months (looking at you, A Little Life). Do you experience book hangovers often? If so, what was the book that caused the worst one? Hope you’ve had a good start to the week. Bye!

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Posted in Book Memes, Discussions

Should readers read books outside their own age range?

“Your Noise reveals you, Todd Hewitt.”

First line in The Ask and the Answer by Patrick Ness

Welcome fellow readers. I hope you’re having a great day and thank you for stopping by. Today’s post is for the weekly meme Let’s Talk Bookish, which is hosted by Rukky @ Eternity Books. Each week we dicuss a different book related topic, and this week the topic is: Should readers read books that aren’t for their target age?

It’s a heavily debated topic we’re diving into today. Therefore, I’ll start with providing a light definition of these age ranges.

Middle Grade

  • Written for ages 8 to 12
  • No profanity or graphic violence
  • Romance is limited to crushes and innocent first kisses.
  • Themes often revolve around friendship, bullying and family.
  • The characters don’t do much self-reflection, but instead react to their immediate surroundings.

Young Adult

  • Written for ages 13 to 18
  • Romance and sexuality are prevalent themes although no graphic sexual content is allowed.
  • The characters are often put in new and difficult situations and the books deal with the struggles to find one’s place in the world.
  • Relies more on self-reflection than middle grade books.

Adult

  • Written for ages 18 and older
  • Anything goes.
  • A more complex story and setting is allowed although not required.

Disclaimer: these aren’t definitive explanations because those don’t really exist. They are just to give you an idea of what I’m referring to when I mention the age ranges.

Now, when discussing the topic of reading outside of one’s age range there are two sides: to read books meant for someone older and to read books meant for someone younger. Let’s start with the first one.

Reading books written for older readers

In my opinion, this is where we run into most problems. As you might have noticed when reading the definitions above, MG and YA are mainly defined by what isn’t allowed in those books. These restrictions are there for a reason, and that is mainly to protect children and teens from content they aren’t mature enough for. I’m not an expert on the minds of children, so I’m going to go much more into that here.

However, I’m also all for breaking the rules. For a middle grade reader that means the parents can allow a book meant for someone older, if they deem it appropriate for their child. They know the child best, and in such cases I don’t think age ranges should be looked at too rigidly.

With teens, I’m fairly certain they can make these decisions themselves. Also, if you tell a 15-year-old they aren’t allowed to do something, you can be certain that’s exactly what they’ll do. Instead, I think it’s more important that teens figure out their own reading tastes and that include reading something they don’t like. I highly doubt they’ll be scarred for life.

To sum up, I don’t think anyone should feel forced to read books meant for someone older, but I do believe it can very educational in terms of figuring out what one likes as a reader.

Reading books written for younger readers

As you can probably tell, I have far less issues with ‘reading down’. There’s no more worrying about not being emotionally ready for certain topics. You can just read what you want.

To more specifically answer the question of the week: should readers read books that are written for younger readers? I think you should at least give it a shot. Reading books meant for children or teens can give you a great insight into the mind workings of these age groups. We’ve all been that age, but we tend to forget what actually mattered at that point in our life. Reading MG and YA can therefore be quite benefitial if you in your day to day life surround yourself with children or teens.

However, if you’ve tried MG and YA and didn’t like it, then of course, you shouldn’t read it. Just don’t look down on other readers who do enjoy it. We’re past that, aren’t we?

To just elaborate on that – I think it’s perfectly fine for adults to read MG and YA as long as you review the book with that in mind. What is deemed great in an adult novel, isn’t necessarily deemed great in a YA novel and vice versa. The result can be a too low rating for a MG or YA novel and that might discourage someone from the target age from reading it.

This section summed up: read what you want but be aware of what you’re reading.

That was a bit of a long one, so thank you if you read all of it. I hope it made you think just a little bit. What are your thoughts on these age ranges? Do you read books that technically aren’t meant for you? Let me know in the comments.

Posted in Book Memes

Are TBR’s necessary to be a book blogger?

“Wind howled through the night, carrying a scent that would change the world.”

First line in Eragon by Christopher Paolini

Hi, guys and welcome to another Let’s Talk Bookish post. Let’s Talk Bookish is a weekly meme created and hosted by Rukky @ Eternity Books. Each week we discuss a new book related topic and this week we’re on the topic of TBR’s. The specific question is whether TBR’s are necessary to be considered a book blogger or a reader.

I will start off by saying that the only thing necessary to be considered a book blogger is that you talk about books. Nothing else. In what way or how much you do it are solely your own choices. Therefore, no, TBR’s are not necessary to be a book blogger, but they can still be convenient.

If you’re able to stick to your monthly TBR (more or less), I think it’s a great way to let your followers know what to expect on your blog. Personally, I like to look forward to a review on a book I love because I’ve seen it on someone’s TBR. That also means, of course, that it can be frustrating for your followers if you post a TBR and then don’t stick to it at all. I know that I don’t like reading monthly TBR’s that include 20 or 30 books, because I know they’re not going to read all of them anyway.

I don’t post monthly TBR’s myself because I never know what I’m reading, and it would stress me out too much to try and stick to it. For me, seasonal or maybe even yearly TBR’s work better.

Posting about your TBR (not necessarily monthly) could also just generate some buzz around those books. Through your comments you can find out what other people think of them and find out which ones your followers look forward to your review of the most. It could help you pick out which books to read first if you care about that sort of thing.

That was it for me this time around. Do you think TBR’s are necessary? Or do you find them too restricting? If you’re someone who do monthly TBR’s, let me know why.

Posted in Book Memes

Underrepresented Tropes and Characters in Books

“Today is the last day I will see my brother.”

First line in Taken by Erin Bowman

Hi, guys and welcome to my first post for the weekly meme Let’s Talk Bookish, which is hosted by Rukky over at Eternity Books. Each week we get a different bookish topic to discuss, which is always great and educational. I’ve been reading her posts for this meme for a while and so I finally decided to take part. This week’s topic is tropes/characters that I think are poorly or under represented in books. I think these things are very genre-specific so I’ll stick to my favorite genre, fantasy. It will also mostly be relating to tropes and characters I miss in YA although it can apply to adult fantasy, too. I will also say that I haven’t read every single fantasy book ever (unfortunately), so these might appear in books I just haven’t read. However, since I haven’t come across them, I will still say they are underrepresented.

The introverted, socially anxious girl who isn’t good in a fight

It isn’t completely odd to see this type of character in books but most often they appear as side characters. This type of girl is never the main character in fantasy. She pops up more often in contemporaries, and I love reading those. I would really like to see her more in fantasy basically because I would love to identify with female fantasy characters more. Don’t get me wrong, those kick-ass, well-spoken women are great, and they definitely also need to be there. They serve a very empowering purpose for other women which is what we’ve been craving for a long time.

Now, they’re just everywhere and I think there’s a need to show some more flawed women in fantasy or at least women with some other qualities and assets. Specifically, the introvert who’s not physically strong but has other attributes. She could be highly intelligent and/or empathetic. There are many options, so dear authors, please include this character type some more. I know it can be difficult to incorporate this character into an action-packed fantasy story but I believe it can be done.

Sports in fantasy worlds

We all know about Quidditch, but I when I was thinking about making this list, I couldn’t recall any other sport from a fantasy world. So many parts of fantasy worlds are copied from our own world so why are sports not more common? The only thing that really come close are those deadly competitions where people gather to watch someone die. Those appear quite often in fantasy. I was thinking of a slightly less violent version of that which of course would incorporate whatever magic the world has. Like Quidditch.  

Only one point of view

I’m not sure if this is considered a trope but I wanted to include it anyway. In fantasy, it’s become more and more popular to have several POV characters in books. Please stop that. There will always be a character I like more than the others, so I’m bored or annoyed when I have to read chapters from the other POVs. It doesn’t mean I hate the book, but it would be nice to just once in a while read a fantasy book with only one point of view. Especially in YA. A YA book doesn’t need so many main characters because they don’t need to be that complex in terms of characters. Remember Harry Potter? The Hunger Games? Only one POV character, and those books are still considered some of the best YA books ever. It can be done.

I’ve also noticed that many authors use dual perspective – a girl and a boy. I think it’s very clever to include different genders to get different perspectives. If it wasn’t because they ALWAYS fall in love, I would love it. Another advantage of a single POV there. At least it would be a little bit more of a surprise who the love interest is (because you know he/she is going to exist).

Do you miss these tropes and characters as well or are there others you wish authors would include more? Let me know in the comments.

Posted in Book Memes

Extraordinary Book Titles

“Chapter the first, in which the Messenger of the Immortals arrives in a surprising shape, looking for a permanent vessel; and after being chased by her through the woods, indie kid Finn meets his final fate.”

First line in The Rest of Us Just Live Here by Patrick Ness

Hi, you lovely people. I’m here with another Top Ten Tuesday post and this time the topic is extraordinary book titles. It’s the kind of topic that is open to interpretation because what is an extraordinary title really? For me that means titles that are completely their own. Titles that can never fit another book and at the same time captures the essence of the content of the book. I have found ten examples of those unique book titles and I’m very excited to share them with you.

Remember, Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish but is now hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl. Go check out her blog for future topics.

As mentioned, I have ten titles for you. The first 5 are titles of books I’ve already read while the last 5 are books I want to read. Many of these books caught my attention by their title so enjoy!

Books I’ve Read

The Lies of Locke Lamora by Scott Lynch

Reasons for being awesome:

  • The promise of mischief.
  • All the L’s. I love saying it out loud.

Red, White and Royal Blue by Casey McQuiston

Reasons for being awesome:

  • The hint of both America and Britain and their blending together.
  • It fits the story perfectly. 

Muse of Nightmares by Laini Taylor

Reasons for being awesome:

  • Sounds like something out of a Shakespeare play.
  • Could also be the title of a dramatic song in a Broadway musical (the true goal of all book titles).

The Rest of Us Just Live Here by Patrick Ness

Reasons for being awesome:

  • Hilarious!
  • Makes you intrigued as to who ‘the rest of us’ are. And why are they just living there?

They Both Die at the End by Adam Silvera

Reasons for being awesome:

  • You know the ending but still want to read it (how is that even possible?)
  • You know you’re going to cry so no unpleasant surprise there.

Books on My TBR

The Lonely Hearts Hotel by Heather O’Neill

Reasons for being awesome:

  • It reminds me of the song by The Beatles called Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (which is funny because I don’t listen to The Beatles).
  • The implication that there’s an entire hotel filled with loneliness and sadness (I like depressing books, alright)

The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet by Becky Chambers

Reasons for being awesome:

  • It’s way too long. I love it.
  • Makes me imagine a cute, little planet with a face on it. I just want to give it hug.

Autoboyograhy by Christina Lauren

Reason for being awesome:

  • Clever!
  • You might need to read it twice to get it.

The Library of the Unwritten by A. J. Hackwith

Reasons for being awesome:

  • The word ‘library’.
  • Hints at a library with secrets. What is unwritten??

You Asked for Perfect by Laura Silverman

Reasons for being awesome:

  • So relatable!
  • Thought-provoking in the best way possible. 

Posted in Book Memes

Top Ten Tuesday: Books I Want to Read Soon

“I walk to the bus station by myself.”

First line in Carry On by Rainbow Rowell

Hi fellow readers. It’s Tuesday. It’s a Top Ten. It’s a great day. Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish but is now hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl and today’s topic is one of the classic book-related posts: my Fall TBR. I don’t really do TBR-posts because it seems like such a commitment. One that I can’t stick to. Therefore, I’ve changed the topic a bit to books I want to read soon (not limiting myself to Fall).

I’m fairly certain I’ll have read at least half of these by the end of the year (when I return to this post in January, I’m going to realize what a failure I am lol). There is an overweight of fantasy sequels but also a few first books in series because I’m me and I can’t finish series before I start new ones. Here they are (I’ll give you a synopsis for the ones that aren’t sequels).

Blood of Elves by Andrzej Sapkowski

Book 3 in The Witcher OR the first book that aren’t short stories so I’m kind of excited to see what that’s like. I haven’t been a huge fan of the series so far so this is basically its last chance. I’ve waited for it for so long at the library but it should be in my hands soon.

Wayward Son by Rainbow Rowell

IT’S OUT TODAY! It’s very close to being my most anticipated release of the year (I only want The Toll more). Now I just need to wait for the library to get it unless I see it in a bookstore. Then I might buy it by accident.

Thick as Thieves by Megan Whalen Turner

Book 5 in The Queen’s Thief. This is the last book that has been released so I really want to get caught up. I believe the final book is coming sometime next year so I need to be ready.

The Lonely Hearts Hotel by Heather O’Neill

With echoes of The Night Circus, a spellbinding story about two gifted orphans in love with each other since they can remember whose childhood talents allow them to rewrite their future.

The Lonely Hearts Hotel is a love story with the power of legend. An unparalleled tale of charismatic pianos, invisible dance partners, radicalized chorus girls, drug-addicted musicians, brooding clowns, and an underworld whose economy hinges on the price of a kiss. In a landscape like this, it takes great creative gifts to thwart one’s origins. It might also take true love.

Two babies are abandoned in a Montreal orphanage in the winter of 1910. Before long, their talents emerge: Pierrot is a piano prodigy; Rose lights up even the dreariest room with her dancing and comedy. As they travel around the city performing clown routines, the children fall in love with each other and dream up a plan for the most extraordinary and seductive circus show the world has ever seen.

Separated as teenagers, sent off to work as servants during the Great Depression, both descend into the city’s underworld, dabbling in sex, drugs and theft in order to survive. But when Rose and Pierrot finally reunite beneath the snowflakes after years of searching and desperate poverty the possibilities of their childhood dreams are renewed, and they’ll go to extreme lengths to make them come true. Soon, Rose, Pierrot and their troupe of clowns and chorus girls have hit New York, commanding the stage as well as the alleys, and neither the theater nor the underworld will ever look the same.

I only recently heard about this book when I read review of it over at Emer’s blog, A Little Haze Book Blog. Even though she didn’t particularly like it, I knew that I needed to read it soon. The synopsis compares it to The Night Circus but from what I’ve otherwise read about it, it also reminds me of A Little Life. A mix of those two books won’t be on my TBR for long.

The Way of Kings by Brandon Sanderson

I long for the days before the Last Desolation.

The age before the Heralds abandoned us and the Knights Radiant turned against us. A time when there was still magic in the world and honor in the hearts of men.

The world became ours, and yet we lost it. Victory proved to be the greatest test of all. Or was that victory illusory? Did our enemies come to recognize that the harder they fought, the fiercer our resistance? Fire and hammer will forge steel into a weapon, but if you abandon your sword, it eventually rusts away.

There are four whom we watch. The first is the surgeon, forced to forsake healing to fight in the most brutal war of our time. The second is the assassin, a murderer who weeps as he kills. The third is the liar, a young woman who wears a scholar’s mantle over the heart of a thief. The last is the prince, a warlord whose eyes have opened to the ancient past as his thirst for battle wanes.

The world can change. Surgebinding and Shardwielding can return; the magics of ancient days become ours again. These four people are key.

One of them may redeem us. And one of them will destroy us.

Technically, this isn’t on my TBR anymore because I’ve already started it. I’m including it anyway because I only made it to page 600 before I had to return it to the library. So, now I’m waiting for it again.

The Bands of Mourning by Brandon Sanderson

The last book before I’m caught up with the series. It would be just lovely if I could check that off on the list before the end of the year. The previous book left me really excited for the series so there’s a chance it will happen.

Eliza and Her Monsters by Francesca Zappia

Her story is a phenomenon. Her life is a disaster.

In the real world, Eliza Mirk is shy, weird, and friendless. Online, she’s LadyConstellation, the anonymous creator of the wildly popular webcomic Monstrous Sea. Eliza can’t imagine enjoying the real world as much as she loves the online one, and she has no desire to try.

Then Wallace Warland, Monstrous Sea’s biggest fanfiction writer, transfers to her school. Wallace thinks Eliza is just another fan, and as he draws her out of her shell, she begins to wonder if a life offline might be worthwhile.

But when Eliza’s secret is accidentally shared with the world, everything she’s built—her story, her relationship with Wallace, and even her sanity—begins to fall apart.

I mainly want to read this because of the anxiety representation which also means I’m very, very scared of it. I have social anxiety and have recently decided that I actively want to try to handle it and learn more about it. That means reading books like this so hopefully I’ll run out of excuses not to read it (if you know of any other books about social anxiety, please let me know).

The Demon King by Cinda Williams Chima

Times are hard in the mountain city of Fellsmarch. Reformed thief Han Alister will do almost anything to eke out a living for his family. The only thing of value he has is something he can’t sell—the thick silver cuffs he’s worn since birth. They’re clearly magicked—as he grows, they grow, and he’s never been able to get them off.

One day, Han and his clan friend, Dancer, confront three young wizards setting fire to the sacred mountain of Hanalea. Han takes an amulet from Micah Bayar, son of the High Wizard, to keep him from using it against them. Soon Han learns that the amulet has an evil history—it once belonged to the Demon King, the wizard who nearly destroyed the world a millennium ago. With a magical piece that powerful at stake, Han knows that the Bayars will stop at nothing to get it back.

Meanwhile, Raisa ana’Marianna, princess heir of the Fells, has her own battles to fight. She’s just returned to court after three years of freedom in the mountains—riding, hunting, and working the famous clan markets. Raisa wants to be more than an ornament in a glittering cage. She aspires to be like Hanalea—the legendary warrior queen who killed the Demon King and saved the world. But her mother has other plans for her.

The Seven Realms tremble when the lives of Hans and Raisa collide, fanning the flames of the smoldering war between clans and wizards.

You can start three new series when you’ve finished one, right? It’s quite a long series so I really want to get started on it… and then wait a very long time before I finish it.

The Girl in the Tower by Katherine Arden

I think I’ve been meaning to read this for the past 3 months. It’s probably not going to happen this year but I’m putting it on this list to at least pretend that I’m pushing myself to read it.

You Asked for Perfect by Laura Silverman

Senior Ariel Stone is the perfect college applicant: first chair violin, dedicated community volunteer, and expected valedictorian. He works hard – really hard – to make his life look effortless. A failed Calculus quiz is not part of that plan. Not when he’s number one. Not when his peers can smell weakness like a freshman’s body spray.

Figuring a few all-nighters will preserve his class rank, Ariel throws himself into studying. His friends will understand if he skips a few plans, and he can sleep when he graduates. Except Ariel’s grade continues to slide. Reluctantly, he gets a tutor. Amir and Ariel have never gotten along, but Amir excels in Calculus, and Ariel is out of options.

Ariel may not like Calc, but he might like Amir. Except adding a new relationship to his long list of commitments may just push him past his limit.

Only the second contemporary on this list, and it’s for those moments when I need a break from fantasy (if that occurs).

Those were ten books I hope to read within the next three months. Do you have some books you absolutely want to get to before we hit January?

Posted in Book Memes

Books On My TBR That I’m Avoiding

“Look, I didn’t want to be a half-blood.”

First line in Percy Jackson and the Lightning Thief by Rick Riordan

Welcome to another Top Ten Tuesday where the topic is books on my TBR that I’m avoiding. Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish but is now hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl.

This list is not going to be very long for me. I tend to keep my TBR fairly short (currently on 60 books) and only add books to it that I’m positive I want to read. There aren’t a lot of maybe-books on there but I did find a couple that was added a long time ago so enjoy.

The Hunchback of Notre Dame by Victor Hugo

This was added after I watched a musical of it which was incredibly amazing (really, go see it if you ever have the chance!). So, I know the story and how different it is from the Disney movie (that was an unpleasant surprise). Maybe that is what’s holding me back from reading it. I’d rather pick up a book that I don’t know how ends, you know. If anyone has read it, I would love to know what you thought.

Any Book By Rick Riordan

I have a complicated relationship with Riordan’s books. I so wish that I could be 12 years old, so that I could actually love those books because I want to read them. They are just a bit on the younger side but my mind is set on reading them so I’m going to. It’s just taking me a while.

The Inexplicable Logic of My Life by Benjamin Alire Sáenz

Both this one and the next book was added to my TBR right around the time I started watching booktube. Both recommendations came from Hannah at A Clockwork Reader, because she was one of the first ones, I watched every video from. She’s very sweet but I’ve come to realize that we don’t really share reading taste. I still watch her videos though. I wasn’t overly excited about this book when I added it, but I love Sáenz other book, Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe, so I’ve kept this one on my TBR. It’s not really calling to me though.

The Weight of Feathers by Anna-Marie McLemore

Another Hannah recommendation. I believe she compared it to The Night Circus, which I really liked so I didn’t need much else to add it to my TBR. I’ve later realized that I’m not a fan of magical realism which this one is. I also know very little about it, so it’s not something I’m dying to pick up.

A very short list for me today, but I really want to know if you’ve read any of these. Maybe you can push me to finally read them (or push them off my TBR).

Posted in Book Memes

Books I Enjoyed That Are Outside of My Comfort Zone

“As Katie wound her way among the tables, a breeze from the Atlantic rippled through her hair.”

First line in Safe Haven by Nicholas Sparks

It’s Tuesday and I decided that I wanted to try out Top Ten Tuesday which was created by The Broke and the Bookish, but is now hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl. The topic for this week is books that are out of my comfort zone but I enjoyed anyway, which is such a cool topic. We all have our go-to genre and a book from that genre doesn’t require much convincing for us to pick it up. The topic/subject matter of books can also make us instantly interested while we steer clear of others. However, sometimes we end up taking a chance on these should-not-be-for-me-books and find they’re actually awesome and maybe expand our future preferences.

I managed to find 9 of these books. They’re not all books I consider to be my favorites but I really enjoyed reading them and they taught me something new about my reading tastes.

The Rosie Project by Graeme Simsion

An adult contemporary romance and that is so rare for me to pick up. It was recommended to me as the funniest book that person had ever read so that won me over. It’s is very funny, and I literally laughed out loud several times while reading it.

A Little Life by Hanya Yanagihara

This is still my favorite book of the year. It was out of my comfort zone, firstly because it’s not fantasy. It’s fiction which I do read but not very often. Secondly, it takes place over several decades which I never like to read. I don’t like time jumps in general which is necessary for a book that spans so many years. A Little Life is the only exception. My love for these characters made me turn a blind eye to everything else.

The Raven Cycle by Maggie Stiefvater

When I read the synopsis for The Raven Boys, I was sure the book wasn’t for me. It sounded like teenage relationship angst with a paranormal twist and that just made me think of Twilight (which I’m very much done with). People kept recommending it and I learned some more about it which made me believe it wasn’t another Twilight. Now, I’m so happy to have read it because that friendship group is perfect.

Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell

My favorite book. I feel weird when I tell people that my favorite genre is fantasy but my favorite book is a contemporary. I do read contemporaries, so it’s not that far out of my comfort zone but I’m still very picky with the contemporaries.

Seriously… I’m Kidding by Ellen DeGeneres

I don’t read nonfiction at all. A friend of mine added this to her TBR on Goodreads and I thought why not. It must be funny. It was hilarious and interesting at the same time so I’ve actually been wanting to read more of her books.

Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë

I forced myself to read at least one classic a year and last year, I picked Jane Eyre because that seemed quite popular. I thoroughly liked Jane as a main character whereas I often feel disconnected from the main characters in classics because of the writing style.

The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss

Yes, I know this is a fantasy book and therefore shouldn’t be outside of my comfort zone. It still is though because of the way it’s told. Our main character Kvothe is telling his life story to a chronicler and to me that’s just one big flashback. I don’t like flashbacks. As I see it, I’ve been spoiled for the ending and now I’m just being told how we got there. Just, no. The Name of the Wind had so many other things going for it, especially the world and the writing, that I really enjoyed it anyway.

American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis

The only horror book I’ve ever read and I’m still wondering why I thought it was a good idea to read it. Don’t get me wrong, I liked it for what it was because I was both fascinated and horrified while reading it. However, I read this in 2015 and there are still images in my head I wish wasn’t there.

Safe Haven by Nicholas Sparks

To end the list, we have another contemporary romance and yes, that was a surprise to me too. I’ve read a couple of Sparks’ books but this is the only one I really liked. The romance was alright but I mostly enjoyed the other themes of the book which I’d never read about before. I think the way Sparks portrayed the issues was the main reason why I was hooked the entire way through.

The end. I hope you enjoyed my first post for Top Ten Tuesday. I’d love to know if you’ve read any of them and maybe had the same experience as I did. What books do you consider to be out of your comfort zone? Chat with me in the comments.