Posted in Book Memes

Top Ten Tuesday – Book Series I Want to Start

“The end of the world started when a pegasus landed on the hood of my car.”

First line in Percy Jackson and the Last Olympian by Rick Riordan

Hi, guys. As it happens, Top Ten Tuesday is 10 years old! Therefore, the prompt for this week is to pick a previous TTT topic, either redoing one you’ve done before or do one that you missed. I haven’t had this blog for very long so I had loads of options in the ‘missed’-pile. My self-picked topic is: book series I want to start. Remember that Top Ten Tuesday is hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl. Let’s begin!


Lumatere Chronicles by Melina Marchetta

First book: Finnikin of the Rock

Daughter of Smoke and Bone by Laini Taylor

First book: Daughter of Smoke and Bone

Farseer Trilogy by Robin Hobb

First book: Assassin’s Apprentice

Chronicle of the Unhewn Throne by Brian Staveley

First book: The Emperor’s Blades

The Winnowing Flame Trilogy by Jen Williams

First book: The Ninth Rain

METRO by Dmitry Glukhovsky

First book: Metro 2033

Unwind by Neal Shusterman

First book: Unwind

The Riyria Revelations by Michael J. Sullivan

First book: Theft of Swords

Green Creek by T. J. Klune

First book: Wolfsong

The Licanius Trilogy by James Islington

First book: The Shadow of What Was Lost

That was 8 fantasy series and 2 dystopias that I really want to read right this moment. There are loads more on my TBR but these are the ones I most want to start. But as we all know, starting series is the easiest thing in the world. We’re not going to talk about finishing them…

Let me know which series you plan to start next. Happy reading, guys.

Posted in Uncategorized

An Update On My 2020 Reading Goals

“The end of our final winter break seems almost like the beginning of a victory lap.”

First line in Autoboyography by Christina Lauren

Hi, guys. At the start of 2020, I made a post about the books I wanted to get to this year. As we are halfway through the year, it’s time to check in and see how I’m doing.

I’ll start by going through the books I’ve managed to cross off the list:

  • Peter Pan by J. M. Barrie

This one featured in my 5-star predictions post, but I ended up rating it 3 stars, unfortunately.

  • The Demon King by Cinda Williams Chima

I didn’t just read this one but the entire series! That’s 3 more books, guys. Maybe I’ll add the companion series to my goals for next year.

  • Autoboyography by Christina Lauren

I wanted to give this author duo a shot and that turned out to be a great idea. I gave this one 4 stars, and will be looking their way again when I’m in the mood for a contemporary.

  • Dark Matter by Blake Crouch

Well, at least I tried this author and now know that he’s not for me. I gave Dark Matter 2 stars.

  • Words of Radiance and Edgedancer by Brandon Sanderson

I have loved making my way through the Stormlight Archive. These two books were given 4.5 and 4 stars.

  • The Dragon Reborn by Robert Jordan

This third book in the Wheel of Time turned out to be quite a big miss for me which is sad because I liked the first two. I’m still going to continue with the series and hope this was a one time thing.


That was pretty good, right?. Let’s move on to the pile of books I haven’t touched yet.

  • The Wise Man’s Fear by Patrick Rothfuss

I don’t care that it’ll be a while before book 3 in this series sees the light of day. I just want to be caught up. Sadly, I don’t see many positive reviews of this second book so it’s not one I’m really excited about.

  • The Shadow Rising and The Fires of Heaven by Robert Jordan

Book 4 and 5 in the Wheel of Time. Considering that I need a significant break between each book, I’m a bit worried about the fifth book. I completely blame the closed-down libraries for this because I was meant to read book 3 a lot sooner than I actually did.

  • Oathbringer by Brandon Sanderson

I’m going to have caught up with this series when the fourth book comes out! I hate having to avoid spoilers for this series so I’m going to be reading it very soon. It will probably still take me almost a month to read so I need to just start it.

  • The Kiss of Deception by Mary E. Pearson

This is the kind of book where if I don’t read it this year, it’s probably going off my TBR because then I’m clearly not motivated enough to read it. I still really want to read it because it’s one I think I’ll really love as soon as I get into it.

  • *3 Neil Gaiman books*

My goal was to read 4 books by Gaiman because I haven’t had much luck with him previously. I want to really give it a shot this year and if I still haven’t fallen in love with his work by December, I’m going to stop trying. I’ve only read one book by him so far this year which was Norse Mythology which was alright but difficult to really judge him on. The only one of his other books I’ve planned to read is Neverwhere. Not sure where to go after that. Any suggestions are welcome!


The last book on the list was The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet by Becky Chambers, which I’m happy to say that I’m currently reading.

That means that I’ve read 8 and a half of the 17 books I wanted to read. Not to brag about my planning skills… but that’s perfect. Halfway through the year and half of the books read. Let’s just ignore the fact that I’ve read all the small books and left all the big ones for the last half of the year.

Do you have goals for 2020? Let me know if you’re on top of everything or now hate me for reminding you. Happy reading!

Posted in WWW Wednesday

WWW Wednesday – June 17th 2020

“For my kind, the first sign our world was ending came on October 24, 1946.”

First line in The Hanged Man by K. D. Edwards

Hi, guys. I hope you’re all doing great. Today I’m using WWW Wednesday as usual to give you a reading update. WWW Wednesday a weekly meme hosted by Sam @ Taking on a World of Words, and it’s meant to give you all a little insight into my reading this week. I’ll answer the 3 questions:

  • What are you currently reading?
  • What did you recently finish?
  • What do you think you’ll read next

What did you recently finish?

The Hanged Man by K. D. Edwards which I gave 5 stars! This is the sequel to The Last Sun which I read last month and really enjoyed. The Hanged Man was even better. The world was fleshed out a lot more so that the confusion I’d felt reading the first one was gone. I still feel a great love for the characters in this and I already miss them.

Oh, and I DNF’d a book… which I never do! That alone should tell you how much I didn’t like Serpent and Dove by Shelby Mahurin. I made it 70% of the way through and had to realize that it wasn’t getting any better. It’s clearly more of a romance book than a fantasy book, which is not my thing because it often means that the fantasy elements are underdeveloped. That includes the characters as well. I must also say that this book was trying so hard to be a “feminist read” that I actually found it kind of sexist towards men. I felt like the men were only there to be used as plot-devices to prove how great the women were. Not really my cup of tea.

What are you currently reading?

My commute book is The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet by Becky Chambers which I’m 31% into. My feelings towards it at the moment are pretty neutral. It’s okay. I’m not used to reading sci-fi so I spend some energy trying to keep the science explained straight in my head. People also seem to praise this series for its characters but so far none of them has really captured me. Not that I hate them, I’m just… neutral.

I’m also reading The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes by Suzanne Collins, which I’m 29% into. I’m conflicted because I’m enjoying it but god, I wish it would pick up the pace. It doesn’t need to be this slow. But yeah, still like what the book is doing when portraying Snow. It’s interesting enough for me to keep reading.

What do you think you’ll read next?

Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman.

Posted in Book Memes

Top Ten Tuesday: Summer 2020 TBR

“The dragon Saphira roared, and the soldiers before her quailed.”

First line in Inheritance by Christopher Paolini

Hi, guys. I haven’t had much time to do Top Ten Tuesday the past few months but today I’m back with my summer TBR. Or a guess at it at least. Top Ten Tuesday is hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl. Here you have the books I’ll be reading these next couple of months.


I know, there are only 8 books on this list but I will argue that Oathbringer counts as at least two, maybe three. What will you be reading during the summer?

Posted in Lost In Translation

Lost In Translation: A Look at Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets in Danish

“Not for the first time, an argument had broken out over breakfast at number four, Privet Drive.”

First line in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets by J. K. Rowling

Hi, guys. It’s time for the second entry in my Lost in Translation series of posts where I compare the Danish versions of the Harry Potter books to the originals to see how much meaning is lost in the translations process. Check out the first one if you missed it. I grew up reading the books in Danish, but switched to the English ones when I was old enough to understand them.

As I mentioned in my post about the first book, I took a few translation classes when I studied at university, so I know a little bit about the thoughts that go into a translation. These posts are really just for fun and an excuse for me to combine my love for Harry Potter and languages.

First, let’s take a look at the Danish cover for the first hardback edition:

  • Aesthetically, I really like this cover. Lots of green colours that goes with the Slytherin theme of the book, but Harry still pops out with his orange/red colours.
  • Love that it is in the air which adds to the giantness of the snake.
  • Don’t know why Quidditch is put so front and center as it isn’t that big of a plot element in this book compared to others. But it looks pretty.
  • We spend most of the book wondering what’s inside the Chamber of Secrets… and you decide to put it on the front cover? Right. Also, I looked at some images of basilisks and this one actually looks more like a King Cobra. It’s small things like this that annoy me a little.

Now, let’s get into the translation part. Just like in the previous post, you don’t need to know a single word of Danish to understand this.

*Be aware that this will contain SPOILERS for the entire series*

‘Original English’ = ‘Danish translation’

The Burrow = Vindelhuset

Harry’s second favorite place in the world, the Weasley home. Looking up the word burrow, it told me that it’s basically a hole or a tunnel in the ground. So naming a house, The Burrow, gives connotations of it being homey and safe, maybe even secluded, but also tells you that it’s not exactly a mansion.

The Danish word for the house is ‘Vindelhuset’ which means The Winding House (like a winding staircase). This name tells you more about the look of the house than its feel. It’s still a very fitting name for the house in my opinion because it indicates its very odd look.

Celestina Warbeck = Celestina Himmelflugt

A name-change for a pretty unsignificant character. In case you don’t remember, this is the singer Molly Weasley loves dearly and listens to every Christmas. Her original last name doesn’t really have a meaning but in Danish it actually does. The literal meaning of ‘Himmelflugt’ is heaven escape, while it’s more often used to describe a quick and major rise or surge in something such as prices. In this case, it might be a reference to Celestina’s voice though.

Floo Powder = Susepulver

It’s really only the first part of this uncomfortable travel method that’s interesting as ‘powder’ translate directly to ‘pulver’. ‘Floo’ is a made-up word but still somehow just fits. In Danish, we have the word ‘suse’ which means ‘to whizz’, which is completely accurate. Whizz Powder. Am I the only one seeing a missed opportunity there?

Knockturn Alley = Tusmørkegyden

This is one of the funny ones. ‘Knockturn’ doesn’t mean anything in English, but when you follow it up with ‘alley’ and say it fast enough it becomes ‘nocturnally’, meaning something that happens at night. This play on words is very difficult to translate exactly, and so the Danish translator just tried to translate the meaning behind it. It came out as ‘Tusmørkegyden’ which means Twilight Alley.

It’s just not possible that there aren’t vampires down there. Thank god, Hagrid found Harry before he ran into Cedric.

The Voldemort Anagram

I’ve always imagined that anagrams must be a translator’s worst nightmare. And this one is quite important. In the original we have:

Tom Marvolo Riddle = I am Lord Voldemort

In Danish that is turned into:

Romeo G. Detlev Jr. = Jeg er Voldemort

So much to unpack here, but first let it sink in that Voldemort’s actual name is Romeo… No wonder he wanted to change it. No one would have taken him seriously as Lord Romeo.

Next up is that G. It’s not revealed in the second book here, but it actually stands for ‘Gåde’ which means riddle. This isn’t revealed until the name pops up again in book 4 though, which made the first chapter of that book a little bit more mysterious. We hadn’t been introduced to that name’s connection to Voldemort. I’m still impressed with the translator’s ability to get that ‘Riddle’ into the name and the anagram.

Then there is ‘Detlev’ which really has no meaning and is just there to make the anagram work. It’s actually more of a German name and not really used in Denmark, at least not anymore. It’s also more a first name as far as I’m aware, so it’s a little weird use of it.

I think it was very clever to add the Jr. (junior) because it’s so often mentioned that it’s his father’s name, and that Jr. is a constant reminder for him. Another reason why he was so adamant about changing it.

Lastly, his title of Lord is left out because they ran out of letters. All other times, he’s still referred to as Lord Voldemort so it’s not a permanent delete. I’m thinking that it was the sacrifice they had to make to get the ‘Riddle’ part in there, and the only other solution would have been to add another name and make it even more complicated. I think it’s fair.

That last one made my head hurt a little, but we managed to get through. I have way too much fun writing these posts so I really hope you guys just find it slightly informative. Let me know if there were any of these translation you found particularly interesting.

Posted in WWW Wednesday

WWW Wednesday – June 10th 2020

“Pedron Niall’s aged gaze wandered about his private audience chamber, but his dark eyes hazed with thought saw nothing.”

First line in The Dragon Reborn by Robert Jordan

Hi, guys. I hope you’re all doing great. Today I’m using WWW Wednesday as usual to give you a reading update. WWW Wednesday a weekly meme hosted by Sam @ Taking on a World of Words, and it’s meant to give you all a little insight into my reading this week. I’ll answer the 3 questions:

  • What are you currently reading?
  • What did you recently finish?
  • What do you think you’ll read next

What did you recently finish?

The Dragon Reborn by Robert Jordan. I just finished it before writing this, and I’m realizing that I can’t possibly give it more than 2 stars. What was the point? I read 674 pages, and I’m not sure why I needed to read so many pages to get the important events of this book. There were so few of them! I dislike the book even more because it’s making me make the choice of whether to continue with the series or not.

What are you currently reading?

Now that I’ve finished The Dragon Reborn, my next commute book will be Serpent and Dove by Shelby Mahurin. I was also currently reading this one last week, but I actually decided to take a break from it shortly after I wrote last week’s post. I wasn’t really feeling it which meant that I was reading two books I didn’t really like. I needed a break from one of them. It means that my progress is the same as last week: 32%.

Instead of reading Serpent and Dove, I needed something I knew I would love so I picked up The Hanged Man by K. D. Edwards, the sequel to The Last Sun. And thank you, K. D. Edwards, for preventing a reading slump. This one is even better than the first because it very early on fixed some of the issues I had with the world-building. The characters are still great. I find myself thinking about them even when I’m not reading. I’m 64% in and dreading reaching the end.

What do you think you’ll read next?

Last week, I said I would start A Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes by Suzanne Collins… which didn’t happen obviously. I finally got my copy so I might start it even though I don’t exactly have the time for it. You see, I also need to start The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet by Becky Chambers because that is a library book.

Posted in Lost In Translation

Lost in Translation: A Look at Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone in Danish

“Mr. and Mrs. Dursley of number four, Privet Drive, were proud to say that they were perfectly normal, thank you very much.”

First line in Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone by J. K. Rowling

Hi, guys. So back in April I reread Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, but I read it in my first langauge, Danish, for the purpose of this post right here. I grew up reading the Danish versions of the books but switched to English when I was old enough to understand them. So I had this idea that I wanted to compare the translated version to the original to see how much meaning is actually lost in the translation process.

I’m not doing a word for word comparision of the entire book because nobody wants that. I’m focusing more on the Harry Potter specific terms/names because those are the hardest to translate and therefore more fun to analyze. I do have a little bit of a background when it comes to translating. When I went to university to study International Business Communication, I took a few classes on the topic so I know a little bit without being an expert. All of this is really just for fun and a way for me to combine my two favorite things: Harry Potter and languages.

First, however, I wanted to show off the Danish cover for the first edition hardback which is the edition I own. And do a little commentary on it. Hope you enjoy!

  • Now, first I have a question: WHAT IS THAT HAT?!? Down by Harry’s feet? The book specified that their pointed hats needed to be black. You might be able to convince me that Dumblefore would wear a hat like that, but that kind of hat is never described in the book so what is it doing there?
  • Is Harry able to create lightning? In year 1? And why is he reaching for it? Is he actually suicidal in this one? I mean I wouldn’t be surprised with the Dursleys and all but damn that’s dark.
  • No more jokes. I actually really like the colour scheme of it and that sort of rock thing around the edge. I imagine that I as a reader broke through a wall to get to read about Harry Potter and Hogwarts.

Now, let’s get into the translation part of the post. I’ve tried to make it as easy for non-Danish speakers to understand as possible. So don’t worry, you don’t need to know a single word of Danish to understand this post.

*Be aware that this contains SPOILERS for the entire series*

‘Original English’ = ‘Danish translation’

The Philsopher’s Stone = De Vises Sten

We’re starting with the infamous title that not even English-speaking countries can agree on. It’s pretty straight forward actually because “philosopher’s stone” isn’t a Harry Potter expression and has existed as a term for several hundred years. So the Danish title is therefore just the Danish version of it.

The direct translation of “De Vises Sten” would be “The Stone of the Wise (Ones)”. So the philosopher is changed into a wise one which is not that big of a stretch. The meaning doesn’t change. However, the translation also changes the number of people involved. In English there’s only one philosopher, but in Danish it’s plural. So I looked into that. Turns out that English has of form of the concept that’s also plural (The Philosophers’ Stone) so both options would work when in Danish, it only existed as this plural form.

Gamekeeper = Godsforvalter

Gamekeeper is one of Hagrid’s titles and that basically means that it is his job to “manage” The Forbidden Forest and all its creatures. The Danish version gives him several other duties, however, by giving him the title of “Godsforvalter”. The most direct translation would be “manager of the estate”, as in a very large estate. Like it’s Hagrid job to make sure that everything runs smoothly at Hogwarts. I imagine his tasks would be something like hiring house-elves for the kitchen and ordering supplies and decorations for festivities. For some reason, I can’t picture Hagrid doing that.

So the meaning changed in the translation but of course not something that changes the entire story. I just remember always being kind of confused about Hagrid’s job at Hogwarts, but it all made sense when I read the English version. The word “godsforvalter” is also a very old Danish word. The title still exists but there are very few of them left so 10-year-old me did not know what it entailed.

Chocolate Frogs = Platugler

This one truly baffles me. The direct translation of “platugler” is… “stupid/lame owls”. OWLS?!? Where did that come from? That’s not even close to the original animal.
Although, “platugler” can have another meaning because it’s also an idiom. It can also refer to someone who cheats/cons, but that makes even less sense in this context.

In my research of why this translation was chosen, I came up with very little. My own guess would be based on the fact that we in Denmark already had something called chocolate frogs. A very popular type of candy actually from a big company. So my guess is that the translator wanted a name that was uniquely related to Harry Potter and not a big brand name.

Still weird to watch the movie when the “owls” turned out to be frogs.

West Ham = Liverpool

This is something you would think didn’t need a translation but here we are. In the English version, Dean Thomas is a supporter of the football team West Ham. In Danish he’s a fan of Liverpool.

As someone who watches football and the English Premier League, I simply needed to address this. West Ham is NOT Liverpool! They aren’t even based in the same city as West Ham is a London club.

The explanation? The only reason I can come up with, is that Liverpool is a more well-known club in Denmark. The Premier League has a lot of supporters around the world, and in Denmark the two clubs with the biggest following (at that time at least) were Liverpool and Manchester United. So maybe the translator just picked one of those so the team would be more recognizable. I still think it’s unnecessary because it’s a book for children so why does it matter? It’s also something that’s mentioned so off-handedly in the book. It’s really not that important.

Fang = Trofast

Here we have the first character-name-change, and it’s Hagrid’s dog Fang. In Danish, he’s called “Trofast” which means loyal or faithful. Now, it’s been difficult for me to know how much meaning the name Fang has but to me it has always been kind of ironic. It sounds like a name for a dangerous dog. One you shouldn’t mess with. It’s ironic because the only thing we really know about Fang is that he’s a huge coward.

That irony isn’t transferred to the Danish edition where his name is much more fitting in my opinion. “Trofast” is the kind of name a dog would have if he was big and lazy. It’s often the name of the dog in old movies here when an old man lives alone and has a dog. 9 out of 10 times that dog’s name will be “Trofast”.

Another thing is that Hagrid probably named him. As “Trofast” is a name for a calm and easy animal, I can only imagine Hagrid giving that name to some vicious and highly dangerous animal. I mean, he named a three-headed dog Fluffy, and so this translation isn’t exactly in character for Hagrid.

The Mirror of Erised = Drømmespejlet

That is one tricky mirror. “Drømmespejlet” can be translated into the mirror of dreams which is actually something that makes sense, unlike ‘erised’. The Danish translation succeeds in describing the workings of the mirror in its name, but should it do that when the original doesn’t? At least not if you haven’t figured out that backwards thing. You don’t get that puzzle in Danish.

The even more interesting part about The Mirror of Erised, however, is it’s inscription: Erised stra ehru oyt ube cafru oyt on wohsi. This was just copy-pasted into the Danish version which is a problem because it only has a meaning in English. Backwards it says: I show not your face but your heart’s desire.

I can only assume that the translator wasn’t aware of its meaning, and thought it to be gibberish. It’s not explained anywhere in the book, but is just left there for the reader to figure out on their own. Imagine how mindblown I was when I, years later, saw someone talking about this online because I had no freaking idea that it meant something. It’s a code that’s easy enough to translate so my guess is that the translator didn’t know it needed to be translated.

Phoenix Feather = Kimærehorn

The most “oh no you didn’t”-translation of this book is the fact that it changes the core of Harry’s wand. Instead of a phoenix feather, Harry’s wand contains a horn from a chimera.

It kept the dual core thing by still explaining that Voldemort’s wand was made from a horn from the same chimera. You’re just still going to run into a problem in book 4 when it’s revealed that the “chimera horn” came from Fawkes…
Now, I don’t actually remember this being a problem as a child and only noticed that change in my recent reread. I have an inkling that when the wand’s core is mentioned in book 4, it’s going to be a phoenix feather. I’ll definitely keep an eye out for that.

As to why this change was made, I have absolutely no clue. It sort of broke my brain when I noticed because I can’t think of a reason why it needed to change to a different mythological creature. But it’s all just really unlucky. The translator had really no way of knowing that the core was going to be that important later on. That’s just J. K. Rowling and her amazing plotting for you.

I think this is the longest post I’ve ever done so thank you if you made it all the way through. I hope it was somewhat interesting. I know I had a lot of fun writing it and looking out for these little things while reading. A few of these I hadn’t actually noticed before.

I want to make it clear that I think translations of books are really important to make books as accessible as possible. No translation is perfect, however, and I find it interesting to ponder the different ways there are to translate a word.
I’ll be doing a post like this for the rest of the books as well whenever I get around to rereading them. Did any of these translations mystify you as much as they did me?

Posted in Uncategorized

Books I Recently Added to My TBR: Wyrd and Wonder Edition (Part 2)

“Hmm. No. I’m telling this wrong.”

First line in The Obelisk Gate by N. K. Jemisin

Hi, guys. I’m back with part 2 of telling you about all the books I added to my TBR in the month of May. It was the month of Wyrd and Wonder so all of these books are in the fantasy genre. If you missed part 1, it’s right here.

As I clearified in the first post, I haven’t necessarily discovered these books through Wyrd and Wonder related posts. This is merely a list of all the fantasy books I added to my TBR during May. Let’s start!


The Lightning-Struck Heart by T. J. Klune

Once upon a time, in an alleyway in the slums of the City of Lockes, a young and somewhat lonely boy named Sam Haversford turns a group of teenage douchebags into stone completely by accident.

Of course, this catches the attention of a higher power, and Sam’s pulled from the only world he knows to become an apprentice to the King’s Wizard, Morgan of Shadows.

When Sam is fourteen, he enters the Dark Woods and returns with Gary, the hornless gay unicorn, and a half-giant named Tiggy, earning the moniker Sam of Wilds.

At fifteen, Sam learns what love truly is when a new knight arrives at the castle. Sir Ryan Foxheart, the dreamiest dream to have ever been dreamed.

Naturally, it all goes to hell through the years when Ryan dates the reprehensible Prince Justin, Sam can’t control his magic, a sexually aggressive dragon kidnaps the prince, and the King sends them on an epic quest to save Ryan’s boyfriend, all while Sam falls more in love with someone he can never have.

Or so he thinks.

Why it sounds awesome:

  • “the hornless gay unicorn”… What? Like you need more reasons.
  • Sounds deliciously weird
  • T. J. Klune is an author I need to try. This is the third book of his I’m adding to my TBR. The first two being The House in the Cerulean Sea and Wolfsong.

The Shadow of What Was Lost by James Islington

It has been twenty years since the end of the war. The dictatorial Augurs—once thought of almost as gods—were overthrown and wiped out during the conflict, their much-feared powers mysteriously failing them. Those who had ruled under them, men and women with a lesser ability known as the Gift, avoided the Augurs’ fate only by submitting themselves to the rebellion’s Four Tenets. A representation of these laws is now written into the flesh of any who use the Gift, forcing those so marked into absolute obedience.

As a student of the Gifted, Davian suffers the consequences of a war fought—and lost—before he was born. Despised by most beyond the school walls, he and those around him are all but prisoners as they attempt to learn control of the Gift. Worse, as Davian struggles with his lessons, he knows that there is further to fall if he cannot pass his final tests.

But when Davian discovers he has the ability to wield the forbidden power of the Augurs, he sets into motion a chain of events that will change everything. To the north, an ancient enemy long thought defeated begins to stir. And to the west, a young man whose fate is intertwined with Davian’s wakes up in the forest, covered in blood and with no memory of who he is…

Why it sounds awesome:

  • Epicness!
  • Forbidden power that character wields anyway. Do I spy a chosen one trope? Because then: Yes, please!

Royal Rescue by A. Alex Logan

At age eighteen, when they become marriageable, all royal children in the Thousand Kingdoms must either go questing to rescue another royal or be hidden away to await rescue themselves. Some go the traditional route of princes rescuing princesses, but not all princes want to be rescuers…and some would rather rescue other princes.

Then there’s Prince Gerald, who has no interest in getting married at all. When he refuses to choose a role as either rescuer or rescuee, his royal parents choose for him and have him magicked away to a distant tower to await a spouse.

Gerald, however, is having none of it. He recruits his guardian dragon and a would-be rescuer and soon the trio is dashing to all corners of the united kingdoms on a quest to overturn the entire system.

Why it sounds awesome:

  • It reminds me of Shrek… Sounds like it also pokes fun at the whole “rescue the princess from the tower” trope. And also gender-bending it.
  • Guardian dragon!

The Goblin Emporor by Katherine Addison

The youngest, half-goblin son of the Emperor has lived his entire life in exile, distant from the Imperial Court and the deadly intrigue that suffuses it. But when his father and three sons in line for the throne are killed in an “accident,” he has no choice but to take his place as the only surviving rightful heir.
Entirely unschooled in the art of court politics, he has no friends, no advisors, and the sure knowledge that whoever assassinated his father and brothers could make an attempt on his life at any moment.
Surrounded by sycophants eager to curry favor with the naïve new emperor, and overwhelmed by the burdens of his new life, he can trust nobody. Amid the swirl of plots to depose him, offers of arranged marriages, and the specter of the unknown conspirators who lurk in the shadows, he must quickly adjust to life as the Goblin Emperor. All the while, he is alone, and trying to find even a single friend . . . and hoping for the possibility of romance, yet also vigilant against the unseen enemies that threaten him, lest he lose his throne–or his life.

Why it sounds awesome:

  • Well, most of the Wyrd and Wonder community seemed to love it during the readalong. I was unable to read it with them but I’m now sure I want to get to it in the future.
  • Court intrigue!!

The Wicker King by K. Ancrum

When August learns that his best friend, Jack, shows signs of degenerative hallucinatory disorder, he is determined to help Jack cope. Jack’s vivid and long-term visions take the form of an elaborate fantasy world layered over our own—a world ruled by the Wicker King. As Jack leads them on a quest to fulfill a dark prophecy in this alternate world, even August begins to question what is real or not.

August and Jack struggle to keep afloat as they teeter between fantasy and their own emotions. In the end, each must choose his own truth.

Why it sounds awesome:

  • Mental health!
  • Sounds like it hurts to read (which for me is a good thing)
  • Contemporary story with fantasy elements

I used to be pretty good at keeping my TBR quite small, but during Wyrd and Wonder, you guys just kept writing about amazing books I’d never heard of before. So THANK YOU! Are any of these books also on your TBR or are you lucky enough to have already read them?

Posted in WWW Wednesday

WWW Wednesday – June 3rd 2020

“Not for the first time, an argument had broken out over breakfast at number four, Privet Drive.”

First line in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets by J. K. Rowling

Hi, guys. We made it to June (or did we?). I just want to take a second to talk about something other than books. Even though I’m not American, I still admire the bravery and resilience shown by everyone fighting for basic human rights for Black people. It shouldn’t have to be this hard. I will continue to have genuine conversations with people around me to hopefully change their beliefs and make them realize that racism isn’t acceptable.

About the books I’ve been reading, I’m using WWW Wednesday as usual. WWW Wednesday a weekly meme hosted by Sam @ Taking on a World of Words, and it’s meant to give you all a little insight into my reading this week. I’ll answer the 3 questions:

  • What are you currently reading?
  • What did you recently finish?
  • What do you think you’ll read next

What did you recently finish?

Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets. Even though I’ve probably read this about 20 times, I still discovered something new, and it was a really wholesome thing that I can’t get out of my head now. I love this series.

What are you currently reading?

I’m reading two books, and I’m sadly feeling kind of ‘meh’ about both of them. My commute book is still The Dragon Reborn by Robert Jordan, and oh my god, nothing is happening! I’m at 65% and still feel like I’m being introduced to the plot. It’s also focusing a lot more on the side characters in this one, meaning we’ve barely seen Rand. As he is the only character I like, I’m struggling.

I’m also working my way through Serpent and Dove by Shelby Mahurin which I’m 32% into. It’s one of those books that’s marketed as fantasy but it’s actually romance. I don’t mind romance in fantasy books. If it’s done well, it’s probably my favorite thing about the book. In this case, however, the build-up to the romance has taken over everything, so the fantasy elements are so far seriously under-developed. I also already know I’m not going to like the romance but I guess I’m hoping for a surprise.

What do you think you’ll read next?

Not really sure about this one. My copy of A Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes by Suzanne Collins will be delivered on Tuesday, so I might just have managed to start that one before next week’s post.

Posted in Fun Lists

Books I Recently Added to My TBR: Wyrd and Wonder Edition (Part 1)

“The market coiled like a colored snake through the streets of Dale, patterned with the brown of the stalls, and the yellows and greens and reds of the things they sold.”

First line in The Ash-born Boy by Victoria Schwab

Hi, guys. I don’t know about you, but Wyrd and Wonder has officially made my TBR into a murder weapon. I can’t imagine it won’t be the death of me. I’ve added so many books to it this past month that I had to make this into a 2-part thing so not to overwhelm you.

Just quickly want to mention that not every book on this list has been found in actual Wyrd and Wonder posts. It’s really a list of all the fantasy books I added to my TBR during May. Let’s get started!

The Golem and the Jinni by Helene Wecker

Chava is a golem, a creature made of clay, brought to life by a disgraced rabbi who dabbles in dark Kabbalistic magic, created to be the wife of a man who dies at sea on the voyage from Poland. Chava is unmoored and adrift as the ship arrives in New York harbor in 1899.

Ahmad is a jinni, a being of fire born in the ancient Syrian desert, trapped in an old copper flask, and released in New York City, though still not entirely free.

Ahmad and Chava become unlikely friends and soul mates with a mystical connection. Marvelous and compulsively readable, Helene Wecker’s debut novel The Golem and the Jinni weaves strands of Yiddish and Middle Eastern literature, historical fiction and magical fable, into a wondrously inventive and unforgettable tale.

Why it sounds awesome:

  • Historical fantasy set in New York but with Middle Eastern vibes
  • From reviews I can gather that it has sort of a whimsical writing style with a focus on characters
  • It has been nominated for several awards including a Nebula.

The Gods of Jade and Shadow by Silvia Moreno-Garcia

The Jazz Age is in full swing, but Casiopea Tun is too busy cleaning the floors of her wealthy grandfather’s house to listen to any fast tunes. Nevertheless, she dreams of a life far from her dusty small town in southern Mexico. A life she can call her own.

Yet this new life seems as distant as the stars, until the day she finds a curious wooden box in her grandfather’s room. She opens it—and accidentally frees the spirit of the Mayan god of death, who requests her help in recovering his throne from his treacherous brother. Failure will mean Casiopea’s demise, but success could make her dreams come true.

In the company of the strangely alluring god and armed with her wits, Casiopea begins an adventure that will take her on a cross-country odyssey from the jungles of Yucatán to the bright lights of Mexico City—and deep into the darkness of the Mayan underworld.

Why it sounds awesome:

  • A historical fantasy set in Mexico is not something I’ve ever read before
  • Any time the fantasy element is based on floklore, I’m in.
  • The three words in the synopsis: “strangely alluring god”. Need I say more?

A Gathering of Ravens by Scott Oden

To the Danes, he is skraelingr; to the English, he is orcneas; to the Irish, he is fomoraig. He is Corpse-maker and Life-quencher, the Bringer of Night, the Son of the Wolf and Brother of the Serpent. He is Grimnir, and he is the last of his kind–the last in a long line of monsters who have plagued humanity since the Elder Days.

Drawn from his lair by a thirst for vengeance against the Dane who slew his brother, Grimnir emerges into a world that’s changed. A new faith has arisen. The Old Ways are dying, and their followers retreating into the shadows; even still, Grimnir’s vengeance cannot be denied.

Taking a young Christian hostage to be his guide, Grimnir embarks on a journey that takes him from the hinterlands of Denmark, where the wisdom of the ancient dwarves has given way to madness, to the war-torn heart of southern England, where the spirits of the land make violence on one another. And thence to the green shores of Ireland and the Viking stronghold of Dubhlinn, where his enemy awaits.

But, unless Grimnir can set aside his hatreds, his dream of retribution will come to nothing. For Dubhlinn is set to be the site of a reckoning–the Old Ways versus the New–and Grimnir, the last of his kind left to plague mankind, must choose: stand with the Christian King of Ireland and see his vengeance done or stand against him and see it slip away?

Why it sounds awesome:

  • It’s partly set in my own country (Denmark)!! I guess mostly people from other small countries will understand my excitement lol. I just need to read it!
  • It’s too reminiscent of the tv show Vikings to pass out on.

I quickly want to shout out and thank Alex from Space and Spellships for bringing this book to my attention. It was featured in the Europe-part of his SFF World Tour, which I highly recommend you check out, especially if you’re on the lookout for books set outside your typical European setting.


Midnight Never Come by Marie Brennan

England flourishes under the hand of its Virgin Queen: Elizabeth, Gloriana, last and most powerful of the Tudor monarchs.

But a great light casts a great shadow.

In hidden catacombs beneath London, a second Queen holds court: Invidiana, ruler of faerie England, and a dark mirror to the glory above. In the thirty years since Elizabeth ascended her throne, fae and mortal politics have become inextricably entwined, in secret alliances and ruthless betrayals whose existence is suspected only by a few.

Two courtiers, both struggling for royal favor, are about to uncover the secrets that lie behind these two thrones. When the faerie lady Lune is sent to monitor and manipulate Elizabeth’s spymaster, Walsingham, her path crosses that of Michael Deven, a mortal gentleman and agent of Walsingham’s. His discovery of the “hidden player” in English politics will test Lune’s loyalty and Deven’s courage alike. Will she betray her Queen for the sake of a world that is not hers? And can he survive in the alien and Machiavellian world of the fae? For only together will they be able to find the source of Invidiana’s power—find it, and break it…

Why it sounds awesome:

  • The Tudor period (no, you don’t need further explanantion)
  • The fact that I had to Google the name “Walsingham” to see whether it was a real name/person (it was)
  • Behind-the-scenes-politics and mixing it with fae

Tigana by Guy Gavriel Kay

A masterful epic of magic, politics, war, and the power of love and hate—from the renowned author of The Fionavar Tapestry and Children of Earth and Sky.

Tigana is the magical story of a beleaguered land struggling to be free. It is the tale of a people so cursed by the black sorcery of a cruel despotic king that even the name of their once-beautiful homeland cannot be spoken or remembered…

But years after the devastation, a handful of courageous men and women embark upon a dangerous crusade to overthrow their conquerors and bring back to the dark world the brilliance of a long-lost name…Tigana.

Against the magnificently rendered background of a world both sensuous and barbaric, this sweeping epic of a passionate people pursuing their dream is breathtaking in its vision, changing forever the boundaries of fantasy fiction.

Why is sounds awesome:

  • An evil king and people on a quest to save the world
  • Kay seems to be considered a must-read fantasy author

The Mirror Empire by Kameron Hurley

On the eve of a recurring catastrophic event known to extinguish nations and reshape continents, a troubled orphan evades death and slavery to uncover her own bloody past… while a world goes to war with itself.

In the frozen kingdom of Saiduan, invaders from another realm are decimating whole cities, leaving behind nothing but ash and ruin.

As the dark star of the cataclysm rises, an illegitimate ruler is tasked with holding together a country fractured by civil war, a precocious young fighter is asked to betray his family and a half-Dhai general must choose between the eradication of her father’s people or loyalty to her alien Empress.

Through tense alliances and devastating betrayal, the Dhai and their allies attempt to hold against a seemingly unstoppable force as enemy nations prepare for a coming together of worlds as old as the universe itself.

In the end, one world will rise – and many will perish.

Why it sounds awesome:

  • Diverse world
  • A cast of several interesting characters

Making these lists always makes me wish I was able to read a 100 books at once. Why have I not mastered that skill yet?!? I can only hope that I’ll be able to read all of these books soon. Do any of these books also appear on your TBR? Or are you lucky enough to have already read them?