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5 Star Predictions #2

“I may have found a solution to the Wife Problem.”

First line in The Rosie Project by Graeme Simsion

Hi, guys. Last week I posted my first 5 star predictions wrap up post, and let’s just say I’d done a pretty awful job of picking 5-star reads for myself. Instead of giving up, I decided to take it as a learning experience so now I’m giving it another attempt. I’ve picked out 5 books from my TBR that I’m pretty sure is at least a 4-star worthy read and hopefully 5.


The Golem and the Jinni by Helene Wecker

Chava is a golem, a creature made of clay, brought to life by a disgraced rabbi who dabbles in dark Kabbalistic magic, created to be the wife of a man who dies at sea on the voyage from Poland. Chava is unmoored and adrift as the ship arrives in New York harbor in 1899.

Ahmad is a jinni, a being of fire born in the ancient Syrian desert, trapped in an old copper flask, and released in New York City, though still not entirely free.

Ahmad and Chava become unlikely friends and soul mates with a mystical connection. Marvelous and compulsively readable, Helene Wecker’s debut novel The Golem and the Jinni weaves strands of Yiddish and Middle Eastern literature, historical fiction and magical fable, into a wondrously inventive and unforgettable tale.

The Ten Thousand Doors of January by Alix E. Harrow

In a sprawling mansion filled with peculiar treasures, January Scaller is a curiosity herself. As the ward of the wealthy Mr. Locke, she feels little different from the artifacts that decorate the halls: carefully maintained, largely ignored, and utterly out of place.

Then she finds a strange book. A book that carries the scent of other worlds, and tells a tale of secret doors, of love, adventure and danger. Each page turn reveals impossible truths about the world and January discovers a story increasingly entwined with her own.

The House in the Cerulean Sea by T. J. Klune

A magical island. A dangerous task. A burning secret.

Linus Baker leads a quiet, solitary life. At forty, he lives in a tiny house with a devious cat and his old records. As a Case Worker at the Department in Charge Of Magical Youth, he spends his days overseeing the well-being of children in government-sanctioned orphanages.

When Linus is unexpectedly summoned by Extremely Upper Management he’s given a curious and highly classified assignment: travel to Marsyas Island Orphanage, where six dangerous children reside: a gnome, a sprite, a wyvern, an unidentifiable green blob, a were-Pomeranian, and the Antichrist. Linus must set aside his fears and determine whether or not they’re likely to bring about the end of days.

But the children aren’t the only secret the island keeps. Their caretaker is the charming and enigmatic Arthur Parnassus, who will do anything to keep his wards safe. As Arthur and Linus grow closer, long-held secrets are exposed, and Linus must make a choice: destroy a home or watch the world burn.

An enchanting story, masterfully told, The House in the Cerulean Sea is about the profound experience of discovering an unlikely family in an unexpected place—and realizing that family is yours.

Drowned Country by Emily Tesh
(The Greenhollow Duology #2)

Drowned Country is the the stunning sequel to Silver in the Wood, Emily Tesh’s lush, folkloric debut. This second volume of the Greenhollow duology once again invites readers to lose themselves in the story of Henry and Tobias, and the magic of a myth they’ve always known.

Even the Wild Man of Greenhollow can’t ignore a summons from his mother, when that mother is the indomitable Adela Silver, practical folklorist. Henry Silver does not relish what he’ll find in the grimy seaside town of Rothport, where once the ancient wood extended before it was drowned beneath the sea―a missing girl, a monster on the loose, or, worst of all, Tobias Finch, who loves him.

Firestarter by Tara Sim
(Timekeeper #3)

The crew of the Prometheus is intent on taking down the world’s clock towers so that time can run freely. Now captives, Colton, Daphne, and the others have a stark choice: join the Prometheus’s cause, or fight back in any small way they can and face the consequences. But Zavier, leader of the terrorists, has a bigger plan—to bring back the lost god of time.

As new threats emerge, loyalties must shift. No matter where the Prometheus goes—Prague, Austria, India—nowhere is safe, and every second ticks closer toward the eleventh hour. Walking the line between villainy and heroism, each will have to choose what’s most important: saving those you love at the expense of the many, or making impossible sacrifices for the sake of a better world.

I am very confident that I’ve picked some great books this time, even though 3 of them are by authors I’ve never read before. The last two are from series I’ve already started and given 5 stars to previous installments. Looking forward to reading these in the next few months and hopefully come back to you with a more positive wrap up post. Happy reading!

10 thoughts on “5 Star Predictions #2

  1. My hopes are so damn high for The Ten Thousand Doors of January. Got it on my kindle right now, and I will be destroyed if it’s not a 4/5 for me.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Your first three picks were all 5 stars for me, I hope you like them too! They’re each very … specific I guess, I’ve seen a few people not love them, mostly really great reactions. I’ve also loved Silver in the Woods and I’m very excited for drowned country.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I hope I share your taste in books then 😀 I have most doubts surrounding The Golem and the Jinni and The Ten Thousand Doors of January, because the few reviews I’ve read seem to confirm what you say: that they’re for a certain type of reader. My instinct tells me I’m that type of reader though so hoping I’ll love them.

      Liked by 1 person

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