Posted in Wrap up

March 2020 Reading Wrap Up

“The trees grew dense and close together in the quarantined zone, magic humming through their branches and stretching in their roots beneath soil and snow.”

First line in The Electric Heir by Victoria Lee

Hi, guys. March didn’t exactly turn out to be a typical month. The world has been crazy and strange but it seems like we’re nearing something that looks like an end to it all here in Denmark. Our government has talked about an opening of society in 2 weeks if all goes well until then. It should still be a slow and gradual opening but it’s something. I’m sitting here hoping that the libraries will be the first open. Pleeeeease!

In other news, March was also the month were I started a Twitter account for this blog @FirstLineReader. I’ve never used Twitter before but I’ve been considering starting one for a while. Now with the O.W.L.s happening in April, it seemed necessary to have an account to actually be a part of that. Unfortunately, my anxiety is just spiking over it because there are so many unknown factors involved. So yeah, I have a Twitter account but I’m going to take my time figuring out what I want to do with it.

Reading-wise, my month was actually pretty good. Just take a look at my stats:

The average rating was highly affected by the 2 (!!) 5-star reads I had this month. Some duds found their way in as well but it was an overall good month for me. So here you have 6 mini-reviews of the books I read in March.

The Library of the Unwritten (Hell’s Library #1)

Author: A. J. Hackwith

Published: October 1st 2019

Genre: Fantasy

My rating:

⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

Buzzwords: Books about books, angels and demons, diversity, magical library

Synopsis: Many years ago, Claire was named Head Librarian of the Unwritten Wing– a neutral space in Hell where all the stories unfinished by their authors reside. Her job consists mainly of repairing and organizing books, but also of keeping an eye on restless stories that risk materializing as characters and escaping the library. When a Hero escapes from his book and goes in search of his author, Claire must track and capture him with the help of former muse and current assistant Brevity and nervous demon courier Leto.

But what should have been a simple retrieval goes horrifyingly wrong when the terrifyingly angelic Ramiel attacks them, convinced that they hold the Devil’s Bible. The text of the Devil’s Bible is a powerful weapon in the power struggle between Heaven and Hell, so it falls to the librarians to find a book with the power to reshape the boundaries between Heaven, Hell….and Earth.

Goodreads

My thoughts

I loved it! It’s a character focused story with a cool concept about a magical library so how could I not love it. I have a full review right here if you’re interested in more of my gushings about this book. 

Infinity Son (Infinity Cycle #1)

Author: Adam Silvera

Published: January 14th 2020

Genre: YA Fantasy

My rating:

⭐⭐⭐

Buzzwords: Urban fantasy, superpowers, fantastical creatures, LGBTQ+

Synopsis: Growing up in New York, brothers Emil and Brighton always idolized the Spell Walkers—a vigilante group sworn to rid the world of specters. While the Spell Walkers and other celestials are born with powers, specters take them, violently stealing the essence of endangered magical creatures.

Brighton wishes he had a power so he could join the fray. Emil just wants the fighting to stop. The cycle of violence has taken a toll, making it harder for anyone with a power to live peacefully and openly. In this climate of fear, a gang of specters has been growing bolder by the day.

Then, in a brawl after a protest, Emil manifests a power of his own—one that puts him right at the heart of the conflict and sets him up to be the heroic Spell Walker Brighton always wanted to be.

Brotherhood, love, and loyalty will be put to the test, and no one will escape the fight unscathed.

Goodreads

My thoughts

I’m disappointed. This book didn’t manage to live up the quality we’re used to seeing from Adam Silvera in his contemporary stories. His first attempt at fantasy sadly shows that this is not his usual genre. The world building is done very offhandedly which left me confused. I felt like I had to stop reading several times because I was wondering how the world worked and fit together. I wanted that information from the book itself instead. 

I had similar issues whenever there was a fight scene. I didn’t feel like I got enough information. People were moving around and doing stuff without my knowledge and then suddenly they were somewhere else (often a very convenient place). It’s very difficult to write good fight scenes because you can also give too much information and slow down an action-packed scene but in Infinity Son I needed more. 

I did quite like the messages and the themes that this book wanted to highlight. Especially those surrounding family and how to be brave. Those felt very much like Silvera. I also think the ending was quite good although not perfect. It’s making me think that I’ll probably read the next book in the series, even though this first one wasn’t much to my liking.

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A Touch of Death (The Outlands Pentalogy #1)

Author: Rebecca Crunden

Published: February 23rd 2017

Genre: Science Fiction/Dystopia

My rating:

⭐⭐⭐

Buzzwords: Oppressive government, horrible futuristic disease, romance

Synopsis: A thousand years in the future, the last of humanity live inside the walls of the totalitarian Kingdom of Cutta. The rich live in Anais, the capital city of Cutta, sheltered from the famine and disease which ravage the rest of the Kingdom. Yet riches and power only go so far, and even Anaitians can be executed. It is only by the will of the King that Nate Anteros, son of the King’s favourite, is spared from the gallows after openly dissenting. But when he’s released from prison, Nate disappears.

A stark contrast, Catherine Taenia has spent her entire life comfortable and content. The daughter of the King’s Hangman and in love with Thom, Nate’s younger brother, her life has always been easy, ordered and comfortable. That is, where it doesn’t concern Nate. His actions sullied not only his future, but theirs. And unlike Thom, Catherine has never forgiven him.

Two years pass without a word, and then one night Nate returns. But things with Nate are never simple, and when one wrong move turns their lives upside down, the only thing left to do is run where the King’s guards cannot find them – the Outlands. Those wild, untamed lands which stretch around the great walls of the Kingdom, filled with mutants and rabids.

Goodreads

My thoughts

This was an exciting take on a dystopian story with a very dark world. It had adventure and romance, while also dealing with themes of grief and finding yourself after losing someone close to you. If you’re interested in more of my thoughts, you’re welcome to check out my full review of it.

The Crimson Crown (Seven Realms #4)

Author: Cinda Williams Chima

Published: October 23rd 2012

Genre: YA Fantasy

My rating:

⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

Go to Goodreads to read the synopsis of the first book in the series, The Demon King.

My thoughts

I was blown away by this ending to the Seven Realms series! Mind you, I went into it with very low expectations because I deeply hated the previous book in the series. The Crimson Crown, however, gave me everything I wanted.

The pacing was great. I wasn’t bored because things kept happening. It was easy to see how all the events were related, and how they were all just small stepping stones to the great finale. Everything had a purpose.

I also loved how the stakes were raised so that I was actually afraid for these characters. There are some dark and brutal scenes that I applaud Chima for putting in a book/series that is quite romance heavy.

Finally, I want to say that I did find the book a bit predictable. Its foreshadowing is pretty obvious but I won’t hold that against a YA book. However, I did not see the final plot twist coming, and that was basically what made me realize that I had to give this book 5 stars.

The Electric Heir (Feverwake #2)

Author: Victoria Lee

Published: March 17th 2020

Genre: NA Science Fiction/Fantasy

My rating:

⭐⭐⭐⭐

Go to Goodreads to read the synopsis of the first book in the duology, The Fever King.

My thoughts

After finishing the duology, I can say that these books will stay with me. They tell a very impactful story that really culminates here in The Electric Heir. It’s centered very heavily around the topic of abuse and how victims deal with it later on. I really like it when these kinds of topics are discussed in a fantasy setting, and this is no exception. Lee has managed to create a world that isn’t just a backdrop but actually amplify the story she wants to tell. A story that is based on a very real-life issue.

Along with the well-crafted world, Lee has also created two main characters that you can’t help but root for. They are the heart of the story and each represents a different aspect of the abuse situation that the author wants to highlight. And she doesn’t hold back.

My only criticism is that the story was a little slow sometimes and I couldn’t help but get the feeling that we were just waiting for all hell to break loose. And it could have done so earlier. I wished that some of the sub-plots were developed a bit more so that there were something to fill out the gaps. Still a duology that I will highly recommend!

Master of Sorrows (The Silent Gods #1)

Author: Justin Call

Published: August 8th 2019

Genre: Fantasy

My rating:

⭐⭐

Buzzwords: orphan boy, school setting, detailed culture and mythology

Synopsis: You have heard the story before – of a young boy, orphaned through tragic circumstances, raised by a wise old man, who comes to a fuller knowledge of his magic and uses it to fight the great evil that threatens his world.

But what if the boy hero and the malevolent, threatening taint were one and the same?

What if the boy slowly came to realize he was the reincarnation of an evil god? Would he save the world . . . or destroy it?

Among the Academy’s warrior-thieves, Annev de Breth is an outlier. Unlike his classmates who were stolen as infants from the capital city, Annev was born in the small village of Chaenbalu, was believed to be executed, and then unknowingly raised by his parents’ killers.

Seventeen years later, Annev struggles with the burdens of a forbidden magic, a forgotten heritage, and a secret deformity. When he is subsequently caught between the warring ideologies of his priestly mentor and the Academy’s masters, he must choose between forfeiting his promising future at the Academy or betraying his closest friends. Each decision leads to a deeper dilemma, until Annev finds himself pressed into a quest he does not wish to fulfil.

Will he finally embrace the doctrine of his tutors, murder a stranger, and abandon his mentor? Or will he accept the more difficult truth of who he is . . . and the darker truth of what he may become . . .

Goodreads

My thoughts

Well, the fact that this book took me 2 whole months to finish should tell you how much I didn’t like it. It has an incredibly slow pace because we practically follow the main character for every single minute of his life for 3 days. That means we also get the boring, everyday kind of stuff described in detail and I’m just sitting here wondering… why?

After the slow start and middle, it does pick up the pace a little towards the end but I still found most scenes too long. Like they were being dragged out unnecessarily and that left me kind of frustrated.

On top of that, I don’t like stupid main characters and Annev here is on another level entirely. He’s even supposed to be smart (and also think he is) which makes it even worse. His cringey “romance” with practically the only female character of the book didn’t improve my opinion of him either.

I will say that the one thing that impressed me about the book was the world building. It’s very detailed in terms of mythology especially, and it’s clear that the author put a lot of effort into crafting it. It’s something I expect will come more into play in the next books in the series.

That was all the books I read in the month of March. Have you read any of them or plan to? How was March for you? Chat with me in the comments.

Posted in WWW Wednesday

WWW Wednesday – April 1st 2020

“The woman’s scream faded, and a baby’s cry took their place.”

First line in Master of Sorrows by Justin Call

Hi, guys. I hope you’re all doing okay and getting some reading done. Here you have my weekly update on my reading through WWW Wednesday. It’s a weekly meme hosted by Sam @ Taking on a World of Words, and it’s meant to give you all a little insight into my reading this week. I’ll answer the 3 questions:

  • What are you currently reading?
  • What did you recently finish?
  • What do you think you’ll read next

What did you recently finish?

The Electric Heir by Victoria Lee which I gave 4 stars. This sequel to The Fever King was quite a bit darker than its predecessor. Lee didn’t exactly hold anything back resulting in a very powerful story about abuse. I also know that these characters will stick with me for a long time. The character development in this final book was brilliant, and I appreciate the author’s attention to detail in that regard.   

10 minutes before writing this, I also finished Master of Sorrows by Justin Call. It was a serious struggle for me to finish and so I ended up giving it 2 stars. I didn’t care for the writing style at all, and I’ve been rolling my eyes over the stupidity of the MC at least 20 times. I generally didn’t care about any of the characters. I found myself hoping some characters would die so that I didn’t have to pretend to care anymore. Not a good sign. The one thing I want to praise about this book is its world. It’s vast and detailed, especially in terms of culture and mythology. We just didn’t see much of it in this book but it’s clear that we will when the series continues. 

I quickly want to mention that I also read A Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare. I own a bind-up of all his works but hadn’t actually read anything from it (I own it because it’s pretty, don’t judge me). I needed something short to read over the weekend so I thought why not. I’m not going to review it because I have literally no idea how to do that but I did enjoy myself. It’s so dramatic it’s hilarious. 

What are you currently reading?

The previous section was quite long and this one is going to be short. I’m not reading anything as I just finished Master of Sorrows. 

What do you think you’ll read next?

The O.W.L.s readathon is starting!!! I’m so excited if you can’t tell. I’m going to try something new (for me) and only read one book at the time while doing the O.W.L.s. Just to try and reduce my own confusion about which classes I’m missing. I’m going to start with Transfiguration and a book containing shapeshifting. My choice is Sorcery of Thorns by Margaret Rogerson. I have absolutely no idea how the shapeshifting element come into play in this book but hopefully I’ll know when I update you next week. 

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Posted in Discussions

My Experiences Being a Fantasy Reader in a World Looking Down Upon the Genre

“The day was grey and bitter cold, and the dogs would not take the scent.”

First line in A Storm of Swords by George R. R. Martin

Hi, guys. I know the headline might be a tad dramatic but I really just wanted to talk about some of the experiences I’ve had as a fantasy reader and try to reflect on them. You see, I’ve been reading fantasy books since the age of 10 when I picked up Harry Potter. As a child I never wanted to read any other genre. The things we read in school that weren’t fantasy confirmed that belief.

However, when I was about 14, I could tell that that wasn’t okay anymore. You see, fantasy is for children and when you grow older you’re meant to develop an interest in “real life” books. I noticed this change when visiting the school library and my teachers would try to pull me towards the non-fantasy shelves. “Aren’t you ready to try something other than fantasy?” they would ask. I would get similar comments from family members: “You’re still reading fantasy? Still Harry Potter?” said in that condescending way. So naturally I started to feel embaressed about it. I stopped talking about reading as one of my passions because that would always prompt the question of what I liked to read. I still only read fantasy but I just didn’t talk about it to avoid being seen as “the weird one” or “the nerd”.

That was pretty much my life until a few years ago when I discovered BookTube and the online book community in general. Suddenly I’m watching SO. MANY. PEOPLE talking about their love for fantasy books. It was also new for me to see women talking about fantasy, and that made a huge difference in my life. It felt empowering in the way that I was no longer alone in my obsession. It gave me the confidence I needed to just embrace my love of reading and not be afraid to talk about it. I no longer felt weird.

Does this mean that everything is just perfect now and people are accepting the fantasy genre? Not exactly but there has been a shift with the huge success of the Game of Thrones show. We were finally the cool people! Game of Thrones really managed to showcase all the merits of fantasy and how it isn’t just escapism, and that opened many people’s eyes to the possibilities within the genre. Just look at how many fantasy books are being adapted into movies and shows at the moment (it’s a lot!).

This is all very good and definitely a huge step in the right direction, but to go back to my own experiences, I still see so many people dismissing the genre. As I now talk more openly about my love of reading, I often get the weird look from people who don’t understand how an adult can talk so passionately about magic. I don’t let it bother me anymore but it’s still there.

Finally, I also just want to highlight some of the problems of being a fantasy reader in Denmark. Now, I read my books in English because that’s what I’m most comfortable with but the fact is that I don’t have a choice. Or rather, other Danes don’t have a choice because very, very few fantasy books get translated into Danish. Only the most popular books get a translation and of those it’s mainly YA books. As an example: the only adult Brandon Sanderson book that has been translated is The Way of Kings. Not Mistborn. Not Warbreaker. The entire Wheel of Time series hasn’t been translated either. Those are some of the best and most fundamental books within the genre that aren’t available to non-English speaking Danes.

I just want to clarify that Danes are able to speak English quite well, but I’ve still met many who find it intimidating to read an entire book in English. Fantasy isn’t exactly the easiest genre anyway. So the lack of translations have an impact on how many people are reading the genre. On top of that, not very many Danish fantasy books are published. And those that are, are so far away from any Bestseller list that they could never dream of hitting them. So there you have your vicious circle. Of course publishers aren’t going to spent money translating books in a genre that doesn’t sell very well. The surge in popularity fantasy books otherwise have experienced hasn’t reached Denmark. We only read murder mysteries here.

I can’t help but get the feeling that our society treats the fantasy genre as less than others, and the result is the shame I felt as a child for reading it anyway. I’m sure a lot of other people has felt the same way and I really want that to change. Fantasy is an amazing genre that can explore so many relevant issues and have just as much literary merit as any other genre.

So what is the solution? It’s difficult to change societal opinions on your own but that is not an excuse to do nothing. I will set the goal for myself to read at least 5 fantasy books by Danish authors by the end of the year. It will require some research on my part because I can’t mention a single adult fantasy book by a Danish author right now. I will also have to overcome my dislike of reading in Danish but I want to view this as an opportunity to find so many more amazing books. And then I want to talk about them! Maybe that will make just a little difference.

Now, I can of course only talk about the situation in Denmark but I would love to know if you’ve experienced something similar in your own country, especially if you’re from a non-English speaking one. Is fantasy a popular genre where you live? Have you experienced your own kind of stigmatization for reading fantasy? Do you think there’s an incresing acceptance of the genre? Chat with me in the comments.

Posted in WWW Wednesday

WWW Wednesday – March 25th 2020

“It was the largest gathering of the Spirit clans Raisa had ever seen.”

First line in The Crimson Crown by Cinda Williams Chima

Hi, guys. I hope you’re all doing okay and getting some reading done. Here you have my weekly update on my reading through WWW Wednesday. It’s a weekly meme hosted by Sam @ Taking on a World of Words, and it’s meant to give you all a little insight into my reading this week. I’ll answer the 3 questions:

  • What are you currently reading?
  • What did you recently finish?
  • What do you think you’ll read next

What did you recently finish?

The Crimson Crown by Cinda Williams Chima, and I’m so stoked to have finished this series just 2 months after I started it. And what an ending! I ended up giving it 5 stars. I finally saw the full potential of the world and this story be realized, and I thoroughly enjoyed myself while reading. This series is quality YA fantasy. I know about the companion series, Shattered Realms, which I will definitely be reading. Just maybe not for a couple of months at least. I think a break will be good. If you’ve read both series, I’d love to know which one you preferred. 

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What are you currently reading?

My commute book is Master of Sorrows by Justin Call, which is a book I started in January but decided to take a break from. The lack of books from the library has forced me to pick it up again, so I’m now 55% through. Reaching that halfway mark felt like a serious achievement because this book is soooo slow. There’s so much unneccesary detail and prolonged scences and conversations. I’ve been very bored. However, I think I finally reached the point were the book actually starts (after 260 pages), so I still have hopes of finishing this book. 

I’m also reading The Electric Heir by Victoria Lee, which I’m 79% into. I’m liking it although it is kind of slow. I’m more accepting of that in this than in Master of Sorrows because the characters are so compelling. The themes explored are also very captivating to me and I really want to see how Lee ends it all. 

What do you think you’ll read next?

I’m kind of hoping that those 2 books will last me until next Wednesday when the O.W.L.s starts. However, if they don’t, I have Sky In the Deep by Adrienne Young on my shelves from an old Owlcrate box. Again, our current situation forcing me to pick up a book I’d have otherwise put off. We’ll see whether it’s a good thing or not. 

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Posted in Book Review

Book Review: A Touch of Death by Rebecca Crunden

“The sun’s relentless heat had been overwhelming all summer, but it was particularly taxing that morning.”

First line in A Touch of Death by Rebecca Crunden

Note: I received a free copy of this book from the author in exchange for an honest review.

Author: Rebecca Crunden

Published: February 23rd 2017

Genre: Science Fiction/Dystopia

Series: The Outlands Pentalogy #1

My rating:

⭐⭐⭐

Buzzwords: Oppressive government, horrible futuristic disease, romance

Synopsis: A thousand years in the future, the last of humanity live inside the walls of the totalitarian Kingdom of Cutta. The rich live in Anais, the capital city of Cutta, sheltered from the famine and disease which ravage the rest of the Kingdom. Yet riches and power only go so far, and even Anaitians can be executed. It is only by the will of the King that Nate Anteros, son of the King’s favourite, is spared from the gallows after openly dissenting. But when he’s released from prison, Nate disappears.

A stark contrast, Catherine Taenia has spent her entire life comfortable and content. The daughter of the King’s Hangman and in love with Thom, Nate’s younger brother, her life has always been easy, ordered and comfortable. That is, where it doesn’t concern Nate. His actions sullied not only his future, but theirs. And unlike Thom, Catherine has never forgiven him.

Two years pass without a word, and then one night Nate returns. But things with Nate are never simple, and when one wrong move turns their lives upside down, the only thing left to do is run where the King’s guards cannot find them – the Outlands. Those wild, untamed lands which stretch around the great walls of the Kingdom, filled with mutants and rabids.

Goodreads

Review

In a world where hovers and arranged marriages are everyday life, we follow Catherine Taenia who has had the sheltered and safe upbringing that comes from having influential parents. She faces great challenges in this book as she is forced on the run along with Nate Anteros whom she hates with a passion.

The books starts off with a strong introductory chapter that really manages to set the tone as dark and gritty. That is in general a strong-point in this book. It’s a very horrifying world. You get corruption, abuse of power (of the worst kind) and people getting executed for seemingly minor offences. Personally, I find it particularly horrifying that people are kind of forced to have children because their society needs more people. As someone who doesn’t want children, I find that extremely scary. I do see a lot of potential concerning the world building in the next books in the series. It seems like we only just scratched the surface here in book 1.

A conflicting point for me throughout the book were the characters. I liked the main character, Catherine, when I was a part of her thought processes. Her describing her feelings and her doubts were probably my favorite parts of the book. It was so well written that I felt was she what feeling. Also, I always appreciate it when authors spend more time on characters’ emotions than what buildings look like. My problems with the characters came into play through the dialogue. For some reason it felt a little off to me sometimes. Like what a character was saying didn’t exactly fit the tone/mood of the situation and said character. It made it difficult for me to get a feeling of the characters, especially the side characters, whose thoughts I didn’t know. That left me only really caring about Catherine which is a shame.

The book has some high-intense scenes that completely captured me and made me unable to stop reading. I could feel that the stakes were high and I wanted desperately to know what would happen. My only problem was that these scenes were cluttered together at the beginning and at the end of the book. Not saying that a book should be all action from beginning to end but the middle part just felt a little pointless. It became just a tad meandering and I had trouble paying attention.

Overall, I do think A Touch of Death is a good book. I would recommend it to those of you who like more character-driven dystopia that still give you an intriguing plot with moments that will make you hold your breath.

Posted in Uncategorized

O.W.L.s Magical Readathon 2020 – TBR

“Here is the boy, drowning.”

First line in More Than This by Patrick Ness

Hi, guys. Today I’m giving you something as rare as a monthly TBR from me. I decided that I wanted to participate in the yearly O.W.L.s Magical Readathon, which is so brilliantly hosted by G from the YouTube channel Book Roast. I’m been following her for a while and saw how much effort she put into the N.E.W.T.s Readathon last fall. I figured I had to try it out so here we are.

Her announcement video is right here:

If you want to learn more about all the details, you should check out the website. The readathon takes place between April 1st and April 30th.

The career I’ve chosen to go for is

Trader of Magical Tomes

Key traits: Eager to learn – Attentive – Calm – Thorough

It’s basically the magical equivalent of a bookshop owner. Of course, that’s what I’m going to be.

The classes (and prompts) required are:

ClassPrompt
Ancient Runes (Heart rune)A book with a heart on the cover or in the title
Charms (Lumos Maxima)A book with a white cover
Transfiguration (Animagus)A book or series that include shapeshifting
History of Magic (Witch hunts)A book featuring witches or wizards

My Picks

Read a book with a heart on the cover or in the title: The Heart’s Invisible Furies by John Boyne.

Synopsis

Cyril Avery is not a real Avery or at least that’s what his adoptive parents tell him. And he never will be. But if he isn’t a real Avery, then who is he?

Born out of wedlock to a teenage girl cast out from her rural Irish community and adopted by a well-to-do if eccentric Dublin couple via the intervention of a hunchbacked Redemptorist nun, Cyril is adrift in the world, anchored only tenuously by his heartfelt friendship with the infinitely more glamourous and dangerous Julian Woodbead.

At the mercy of fortune and coincidence, he will spend a lifetime coming to know himself and where he came from – and over his three score years and ten, will struggle to discover an identity, a home, a country and much more.

In this, Boyne’s most transcendent work to date, we are shown the story of Ireland from the 1940s to today through the eyes of one ordinary man. The Heart’s Invisible Furies is a novel to make you laugh and cry while reminding us all of the redemptive power of the human spirit.

Read a book with a white cover: Lord of Secrets by Breanna Teintze

Synopsis

Outlaw wizard Corcoran Gray has enough problems. He’s friendless, penniless and on the run from the tyrannical Mages’ Guild – and with the search for his imprisoned grandfather looking hopeless, his situation can’t get much worse.

So when a fugitive drops into his lap – literally – and gets them both arrested, it’s the last straw – until Gray realises that runaway slave Brix could be the key to his grandfather’s release. All he has to do is break out of prison, break into an ancient underground temple and avoid killing himself with his own magic in the process.

In theory, it’s simple enough. But as secrets unfold and loyalties shift, Gray discovers something with the power to change the nature of life and death itself.

Now Gray must find a way to protect the people he loves, but it could cost him everything, even his soul . .

A book that includes shapeshifting: Sorcery of Thorns by Margaret Rogerson

Synopsis

All sorcerers are evil. Elisabeth has known that as long as she has known anything. Raised as a foundling in one of Austermeer’s Great Libraries, Elisabeth has grown up among the tools of sorcery—magical grimoires that whisper on shelves and rattle beneath iron chains. If provoked, they transform into grotesque monsters of ink and leather. She hopes to become a warden, charged with protecting the kingdom from their power.

Then an act of sabotage releases the library’s most dangerous grimoire. Elisabeth’s desperate intervention implicates her in the crime, and she is torn from her home to face justice in the capital. With no one to turn to but her sworn enemy, the sorcerer Nathaniel Thorn, and his mysterious demonic servant, she finds herself entangled in a centuries-old conspiracy. Not only could the Great Libraries go up in flames, but the world along with them.

As her alliance with Nathaniel grows stronger, Elisabeth starts to question everything she’s been taught—about sorcerers, about the libraries she loves, even about herself. For Elisabeth has a power she has never guessed, and a future she could never have imagined.

A book featuring witches or wizards: Serpent and Dove by Shelby Mahurin

Synopsis

Two years ago, Louise le Blanc fled her coven and took shelter in the city of Cesarine, forsaking all magic and living off whatever she could steal. There, witches like Lou are hunted. They are feared. And they are burned.

Sworn to the Church as a Chasseur, Reid Diggory has lived his life by one principle: thou shalt not suffer a witch to live. His path was never meant to cross with Lou’s, but a wicked stunt forces them into an impossible union—holy matrimony.

The war between witches and Church is an ancient one, and Lou’s most dangerous enemies bring a fate worse than fire. Unable to ignore her growing feelings, yet powerless to change what she is, a choice must be made.

And love makes fools of us all.

Those are the books I plan to be the ones which will get me my necessary O.W.L.s. However, things are complicated by the fact that currently, all libraries in Denmark are closed (along with everything else). That means it’s a little difficult for me to get the books but I’m trying to work around it by using ebooks. Just letting you know that yes, this is my tbr but it is subject to change in case things don’t work out according to plan.

I’m so excited to participate in my first Magical Readathon! Please let me know if you’re participating too and what career you’ve chosen. Feel free to link you tbr in the comments if you have one. Happy reading!

Posted in WWW Wednesday

WWW Wednesday – March 18th 2020

“The sun’s relentless heat had been overwhelming all summer, but it was particularly taxing that morning.”

First line in A Touch of Death by Rebecca Crunden

Hi, guys. I hope you’re all managing despite everything that’s going on. I’m lucky enough to still be able to go to work but it’s difficult here in Denmark. I just listened to our Queen give a “speech to the nation”. Fun fact: she’s been our Queen since 1972 but she has never given a speech before (besides the one she gives on New Year’s Eve). I think that made me realize that’s it’s quite serious. But moving on to happier things: books!

Here you have my weekly update on my reading through WWW Wednesday. It’s a weekly meme hosted by Sam @ Taking on a World of Words, and it’s meant to give you all a little insight into my reading this week. I’ll answer the 3 questions:

  • What are you currently reading?
  • What did you recently finish?
  • What do you think you’ll read next

What did you recently finish?

Just before writing this, I finished A Touch of Death by Rebecca Crunden. A gripping dystopian with high stakes that I quite enjoyed. However, I had a few issues with the characterizations throughout the book so I think my rating is going to be 3 stars. I’ll have a full review up for this one soon. 

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What are you currently reading?

I’m very close to finishing The Crimson Crown by Cinda Williams Chima as I only have 80 pages left. My enjoyment-level is currently at 100%! This book is giving me everything I wanted when I started the series with The Demon King. I have to know the ending before I make my final judgement, but I believe this one is my favorite in the series. 

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What do you think you’ll read next?

Last week I said I was going to start The Dragon Reborn by Robert Jordan. Sadly that won’t happen as the libraries shut down so I’m not able to actually get the book. Instead I’ll read The Electric Heir by Victoria Lee. It’s the sequel to The Fever King and one of my most anticipated releases. I can’t wait to read it!

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